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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 211–233 | Cite as

Strategy for Cultural Heritage Management (CHM) in Africa: A Case Study

  • Audax Z. P. Mabulla
Article

Abstract

Africa is both fortunate and unfortunate as far as Cultural Heritage Management (CHM) is concerned. Fortunate because the continent is a warehouse for the heritage resources, which document the origin and development of our humanity. In the meantime, it is very unfortunate that Africa is too poor to take care of such vast cultural treasures. In this paper, I use Tanzania as a case study to explore ways that Africa can generate revenue and public support for CHM. An effective means of accomplishing this goal is to make the products of the past attractive and accessible for cultural tourism. Only in this way does Africa's past heritage become economically sustainable for long-term survival, productivity, and contribution to global education, research, tourism, and pride in the past accomplishments of humanity.

L'Afrique est à la fois heureuse et malheureuse en ce qui concerne la Gestion du Patrimoine Culturel (GPC). Heureuse parce que ce continent est un entrepôt de ressources de documentation sur l'origine et le développement de l'humanité. Mais en mème temps, il est trés malheureux que l'Afrique soit si pauvre pour prendre soin d'un si grand trésor culturel. Dans cet article, je me suis servi de la Tanzanie comme cas d'étude pour explorer les moyens par lesquels l'Afrique pourrait générer des recettes et un appui public à la GPC. Un moyen efficace pour accomplir ce but est de rendre les produits du passé attrayants et accessibles pour un tourisme culturel. C'est par ce moyen seul que l'héritage du passé africain deviendra économiquement soutenable pour réaliser une survie à longue portée, la productivité, et une contribution a l'éducation mondiale, à la recherche, au tourisme et à la fierté des réalisations du passé humain.

cultural tourism Olduvai Gorge Laetoli Isimila Australopithecus afarensis A. boisei Homo habilis 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Audax Z. P. Mabulla
    • 1
  1. 1.Archaeology UnitUniversity of Dar es SalaamDar es SalaamTanzania

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