Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 89–96 | Cite as

A Family Genetic Study of Autism Associated with Profound Mental Retardation

  • Elizabeth Starr
  • Sibel Kazak Berument
  • Andrew Pickles
  • Megan Tomlins
  • Anthony Bailey
  • Katerina Papanikolaou
  • Michael Rutter
Article

Abstract

We sought to determine if the family loading for either the broader autism phenotype or for cognitive impairment differed according to whether or not autism was accompanied by severe mental retardation. The sample comprised 47 probands with autism meeting ICD-10 criteria, as assessed by the Autism Diagnostic Interview and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Family history interview and findings were compared with those for the higher IQ autism and Down syndrome samples in the Bolton et al. (1994) study. The familial loading for autism and for the broader phenotype was closely comparable to that in the study of higher IQ autism, and different from that for Down syndrome. The family loading for scholastic achievement difficulties was slightly, but significantly, higher when autism was accompanied by severe retardation.

Autism mental retardation genetics 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth Starr
    • 1
  • Sibel Kazak Berument
    • 1
  • Andrew Pickles
    • 1
  • Megan Tomlins
    • 1
  • Anthony Bailey
    • 1
  • Katerina Papanikolaou
    • 1
  • Michael Rutter
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research Council Child Psychiatry UnitInstitute of PsychiatryLondonUnited Kingdom

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