The Estimate of Risk of Adolescent Sexual Offense Recidivism (ERASOR): Preliminary Psychometric Data

Article

Abstract

The Estimate of Risk of Adolescent Sexual Offense Recidivism (ERASOR) is an empirically guided checklist designed to assist clinicians to estimate the short-term risk of a sexual reoffense for youth aged 12–18 years of age. The ERASOR provides objective coding instructions for 25 risk factors (16 dynamic and 9 static). To investigate the psychometric properties, risk ratings were collected from 28 clinicians who evaluated 136 adolescent males (aged 12–18 years) following comprehensive, clinical assessments. Preliminary psychometric data (i.e., interrater agreement, item–total correlation, internal consistency) were found to be supportive of the reliability and item composition of the tool. ERASOR ratings also significantly discriminated adolescents based on whether or not they had previously been sanctioned for a prior sexual offense.

risk assessment adolescents sexual offending recidivism 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sexual Abuse: Family Education & Treatment (SAFE-T) Program, Thistletown Regional Centre for Children and AdolescentsOntario Ministry of Community, Family and Children's ServicesTorontoCanada

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