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Research in Higher Education

, Volume 45, Issue 5, pp 443–461 | Cite as

Why Do Universities Compete in the Ratings Game? An Empirical Analysis of the Effects of the U.S. News and World Report College Rankings

  • Marc MeredithEmail author
Article

Abstract

Previous research has concluded that an institution's ranking in the annual U.S. News and World Report “Best Colleges” issue impacts admission outcomes and pricing decisions at schools in the Consortium for Financing Higher Education. This article expands on the previous work by analyzing the effects of the U.S. News and World Report rankings across a broader range of universities and variables. The results show that many schools' admission outcomes are responsive to movements in the rankings; however changes in rank are more significant at certain locations in the rankings and affect public and private schools differently. The results also show that the socioeconomic and racial demographics of highly ranked universities may also be affected by changes in rank.

college rankings admission outcomes pricing decisions demographics 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Stanford University Graduate School of BusinessStanford

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