Photosynthetica

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 417–423 | Cite as

Effects of Potato Virus YNTN Infection on Gas Exchange and Photosystem 2 Function in Leaves of Solanum tuberosum L.

  • Y.H. Zhou
  • Y.H. Peng
  • J.L. Lei
  • L.Y. Zou
  • J.H. Zheng
  • J.Q. Yu
Article

Abstract

Photosynthetic responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Chunzao) were examined during potato virus Y (PVYNTN) infection. PVYNTN infection significantly reduced net photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, but had little influence on intercellular CO2 concentration. As the disease developed, the maximum carboxylation velocity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and the maximum electron transport rate contributing to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration gradually decreased, followed by substantial reductions in the relative quantum efficiency of photosystem 2 (PS2) electron transport, the efficiency of excitation energy capture by open PS2 reaction centres, and photochemical quenching, but not in sustained photoinhibition. Thus PVYNTN depressed photosynthesis mainly by interfering with the enzymatic processes in the Calvin cycle which resulted in a down-regulation of electron transport.

chlorophyll fluorescence intercellular CO2 concentration net photosynthetic rate photochemistry photosynthetic electron transport potato potato virus Y quantum yield stomatal conductance 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y.H. Zhou
    • 1
  • Y.H. Peng
    • 1
  • J.L. Lei
    • 1
  • L.Y. Zou
    • 1
  • J.H. Zheng
    • 1
  • J.Q. Yu
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Horticultural DepartmentHuajiachi Campus, Zhejiang UniversityChina
  2. 2.Laboratory of Horticultural Plant GrowthDevelopment and Biotechnology, Ministry of AgricultureChina

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