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Natural Computing

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 53–76 | Cite as

A Study on the use of ``self-generation'' in memetic algorithms

  • Natalio Krasnogor
  • Steven Gustafson
Article

Abstract

A vast number of very successful applications of Global-Local Search Hybrids have been reported in the literature in the last years for a wide range of problem domains. The majority of these papers report the combination of highly specialized pre-existing local searchers and usually purpose-specific global operators (e.g. genetic operators in an Evolutionary Algorithm).In this paper we concentrate on one particular class of Global-Local Search Hybrids, Memetic Algorithms (MAs), and we describe the implementation of ``self-generating'' mechanisms to produce the local searches the MA uses. This implementation is tested in two problems, NK-Landscape Problems and the Maximum Contact Map Overlap Problem (MAX-CMO).

contact map overlap memetic algorithms NK-Landscapes self-assembling self-generation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalio Krasnogor
    • 1
  • Steven Gustafson
    • 1
  1. 1.Automated Scheduling, Optimization and Planning Group, School of Computer Science and IT, University of NottinghamNottinghamUK (

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