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Mycopathologia

, Volume 156, Issue 4, pp 309–312 | Cite as

Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Chaetomium Globosum in an Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient

  • A.B.A. Teixeira
  • P. Trabasso
  • M.L. Moretti-Branchini
  • F.H. Aoki
  • A.C. Vigorito
  • M. Miyaji
  • Y. Mikami
  • M. Takada
  • A.Z. Schreiber
Article

Abstract

Bone marrow transplant recipients are highly susceptible to opportunistic fungal infections. This is the report, of the first case of a Chaetomium systemic infection described in Brazil. A 34 year-old patient with chronic myeloid leukemia underwent an allogeneic sibling matched bone marrow transplant. Seven months later, he developed systemic infection with enlargement of the axillary and cervical lymph nodes. Culture of the aspirates from both lymph nodes yielded Chaetomium globosum. The infection was successfully treated with amphotericin B. The increasing population of immunosupressed patients requires a careful microbiologic investigation for uncommon fungal infections.

Amphotericin B bone marrow transplant Chaetomium globosum phaeohyphomycosis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • A.B.A. Teixeira
    • 1
  • P. Trabasso
    • 2
  • M.L. Moretti-Branchini
    • 2
  • F.H. Aoki
    • 2
  • A.C. Vigorito
    • 3
  • M. Miyaji
    • 4
  • Y. Mikami
    • 4
  • M. Takada
    • 4
  • A.Z. Schreiber
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Pathology DepartmentUniversidade Estadual de Campinas-UNICAMPBrazil
  2. 2.Infectious Diseases DivisionUniversidade Estadual de Campinas-UNICAMPBrazil
  3. 3.Hematology DivisionUniversidade Estadual de Campinas-UNICAMPBrazil
  4. 4.Research Center for Pathogenic Fungi and Microbial ToxicosisChiba UniversityJapan

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