Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics

, Volume 24, Issue 6, pp 501–509 | Cite as

The ethics of receiving

  • Kate Lindemann

Abstract

As a teacher and philosopher, Dr.Kate Lindemann has spent much of herprofessional life thinking about morality inhuman relationships. Critical analyses aboundabout the obligations and particularresponsibilities of health care providers topatients, teachers to students, etc. Suchanalyses often emphasize the inherentinequality, and thusvulnerability, of those who are the recipientsof care or knowledge. Though familiar with theethics of care as a moral framework, Dr.Lindemann's perspectives on such relationshipswere profoundly affected and foreveraltered after acquiring a brain injury in1998. The current manuscript describes how herviews on caring acts as not only dynamic butreciprocal have been shaped by her experiencesduring rehabilitation andas a person now living with disability.

disability ethics of care reception 

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REFERENCES

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kate Lindemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Mt St Mary CollegeNewburgh

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