Advertisement

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 258, Issue 3, pp 519–524 | Cite as

Effects of residential radon on cancer incidence

  • I. Lázár
  • E. Tóth
  • G. Marx
  • I. Cziegler
  • G. J. Köteles
Article

Abstract

Radon activity concentrations of 1077 homes were surveyed in two villages of Northern Hungary to obtain the yearly averages. The distribution of indoor radon activity concentrations covered a wide range. Cancer incidences of all the 2680 inhabitants for the last 30 years were also studied in these villages in order to establish a possible correlation with radon exposure. The methods applied in the analysis allow to draw up statistically supported statements concerning the relative cancer risks of different radon level groups. The results show that among non-smoking middle-aged women the frequency of cancer, regardless to tumor types, is lower for those who live in residential radon activity concentrations of a level between 110 and 185 Bq.m-3 compared to those living in radon levels outside this range. A minimum value in the cancer frequency exists at a level of significance p<0.008 (determined with the help of Fisher's test). In general, the present study corroborates the outcome of other studies demonstrating the existence of a biopositive effect, and suggests a wider concept of radon health effects.

Keywords

Cancer Risk Radon Health Effect Tumor Type Cancer Incidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    W. J. Blot, Z. Y. Xu, J. D. Boice et al., J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 82 (1990) 1025.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    K. T. Bogen, D. W. Layton, Human Exp. Toxicol., 17 (1998) 463.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    B. L. Cohen, Environ. Res., 53 (1990) 193.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. L. Cohen, Health Phys., 68 (1995) 157.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Czeizel, H.-G. Beakmann, H. W. Goedde, Genetics of the Hungarian Population, Vol. 3, Springer, Berlin, 1991, p. 319.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    P. Duport, D. Krewski, X. Luo, J. Zielinski, Cancer Risk at Low Doses and Dose Rates of Ionizing Radiation in Animals, Proc. of IRPA 10th Intern. Congress of The International Radiation Protection Association, Hiroshima, Japan, 2000.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    L. E. Feinendegen, Human Exper. Toxic., 21 (2002) 85.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    L. I. Havlicek, R. D. Crain, Practical Statistics for the Physical Sciences, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 1988.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    R. M. Haynes, Radiat. Prot. Dosim., 25 (1988) 93.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    HCSO, Cancer mortality statistics, Report of the Hungarian Central Statistical Office, 2002.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    ICRP, Protection Against Radon-222 at Home and at Work. ICRP Publication 65. A report of a Task Group of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1993.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    K. Kant, R. P. Chauhan, G. S. Sharma, S. K. Chakravarti, On the Evidence of Radiation Hormesis in Humans Exposed to Low-Level Ionizing Radiation, Abstract Book of the 2nd Intern. Conf. of World Council of Nuclear Workers, The Effects of Low and Very Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation on Human Health, Dublin, Ireland, 2001.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    G. J. KÖteles, Central European J. Occup. Environ. Med., 4/2 (1998) 103.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    H. P. Leenhouts, M. J. P. Brugmans, Radiat. Environ. Biophys., 40 (2001) 11.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. H. Lubin, J. D. Boice Jr., J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 89 (1997) 49.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    T. D. Luckey, Intern. J. Occup. Med. Toxicol., 3/2 (1994) 73.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    T. D. Luckey, Low Dose Irradiation Reduces Cancer Mortality Rates. Proc. of IRPA 10th Intern. Congress of The International Radiation Protection Association, Hiroshima, Japan, 2000.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    W. Luxin, J. Radiat. Res., 31 (1990) 119.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    M. Mifune, T. Sobue, H. Arimoto et al., Japan J. Cancer Res., 83 (1992) 1.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    S. M. J. Mortazavi, M. Ghiassi-nejad, P. A. Karam, T. Ikushima, A. Niroomand-rad, J. R. Cameron, Cancer Incidence in Areas with Elevated Levels of Natural Radiation, Abstract Book of 2nd Intern. Conf. of World Council of Nuclear Workers, The Effects of Low and Very Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation on Human Health, Dublin, Ireland, 2001.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    K. S. V. Nambi, S. D. Soman, Health Phys., 52 (1987) 653.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    G. Pershagen, G. Akerblom, O. Axelson et al., New Engl. J. Med., 330 (1994) 159.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    M. Pollycove, L. E. Feinendegen, C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Sciences de la vie/Life Sciences, 322 (1999) 197.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    M. Pollycove, L. E. Feinendegen, Molecular Biology, Epidemiology and Radiation Protection, Abstract Book of 2nd Intern. Conf. of World Council of Nuclear Workers, The Effects of Low and Very Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation on Human Health, Dublin, Ireland, 2001.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    E. TÓth, High Radon Activity in North-East Hungary. Physica Scripta, 50/6 (1994) 726.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    E. TÓth, F. DeÁk, Cs. GyurkÓcza, Zs. Kasztovszky, R. Kuczi, G. Marx et al., Environ. Geol. 31/1-2 (1997) 123.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    E. TÓth, I. LÁzÁr, D. Selmeczi, G. Marx, Pathol. Oncol. Res., 4/2 (1998) 125.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    UNSCEAR, Sources and Effects of Ionizing Radiation, UNSCEAR 2000 Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annexes, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, 2000.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    W. Ye, T. Sobue, V. S. Lee, Japan J. Cancer Res., 89 (1998) No. 8, 789.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers/Akadémiai Kiadó 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Lázár
    • 1
  • E. Tóth
    • 1
  • G. Marx
    • 2
  • I. Cziegler
    • 1
  • G. J. Köteles
    • 3
  1. 1.RAD LaboratoryBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Atomic Physics DepartmentEötvös UniversityBudapestHungary
  3. 3.“Fodor József” National Center of Public Health “Frederic Joliot-Curie” National Research Institute for Radiobiology and RadiohygieneBudapestHungary

Personalised recommendations