Perfectionism, Cognition, and Affect in Response to Performance Failure vs. Success

  • Avi Besser
  • Gordon L. Flett
  • Paul L. Hewitt
Article

Abstract

The current paper describes the results of an experiment in which 200 students who varied in levels of trait perfectionism performed a laboratory task of varying levels of difficulty. Participants received either negative or positive performance feedback, independent of their actual level of performance. Analyses of pre-task and post-task measures of negative and positive affect showed that individuals with high self-oriented perfectionism experienced a general increase in negative affect after performing the task, and self-oriented perfectionists who received negative performance feedback were especially likely to report decreases in positive affect. Additional analyses showed that self-oriented perfectionists who received negative feedback responded with a cognitive orientation characterized by performance dissatisfaction, cognitive rumination, and irrational task importance. In contrast, there were relatively few significant differences involving other-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism. Collectively, our findings support the view that self-oriented perfectionism is a vulnerability factor involving negative cognitive and affective reactions following failure experiences that reflect poorly on the self.

Perfectionism Cognition Performance feedback Anxiety Depression Hostility. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Avi Besser
    • 1
  • Gordon L. Flett
    • 2
  • Paul L. Hewitt
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral SciencesSapir Academic CollegeIsrael
  2. 2.York UniversityCanada
  3. 3.University of British ColumbiaCanada

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