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Dimensions of Perfectionism and Anxiety Sensitivity

  • Gordon L. Flett
  • Andrea Greene
  • Paul L. Hewitt
Article

Abstract

The current study investigated the extent to which dimensions of perfectionism are associated with components of the anxiety sensitivity construct. A sample of 177 undergraduate students completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Perfectionism Cognitions Inventory, the Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale, and the Expanded Anxiety Sensitivity Index developed by Taylor and Cox (1998). The results confirmed that automatic thoughts involving perfectionism and the interpersonal aspects of the perfectionism construct are associated with anxiety sensitivity. Examination of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index factors showed that perfectionism cognitions were associated primarily with anxiety sensitivity involving fears of cognitive dyscontrol, while socially prescribed perfectionism and perfectionistic self-presentation were associated primarily with fears of publicly observable anxiety reactions in a manner suggesting that the interpersonal perfectionism dimensions are linked closely with an anxious sensitivity to negative social evaluation and subsequent panic attacks. The theoretical and treatment implications of the link between perfectionism and anxiety sensitivity are discussed.

anxiety sensitivity cognitions fear perfectionism 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon L. Flett
    • 1
  • Andrea Greene
    • 2
  • Paul L. Hewitt
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyYork UniversityTorontoCanada
  2. 2.York UniversityUSA
  3. 3.University of British ColumbiaUSA

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