Journal of Quantitative Criminology

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 441–445 | Cite as

A Seeded Sample of Concealed-Carry Permit Holders

  • Tom W. Smith
Article

Abstract

A pilot study using a seeded sample finds that gun-carrying and permit holding are accurately reported by concealed-carry permit holders. This is consistent with the findings of past validation studies of gun ownership. Moreover, the similarity in gun uses across the seeded and cross-section samples indicates that both collect consistent data.

firearms reliability validation surveys 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom W. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.National Opinion Research CenterUniversity of ChicagoChicago

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