Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 30, Issue 9, pp 1771–1780 | Cite as

Behavioral Changes in Workers of the Leaf-Cutting Ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa Induced by Chemical Components of Eucalyptus maculata Leaves

  • A. L. MarsaroJr.
  • R. C. Souza
  • T. M. C. Della Lucia
  • J. B. Fernandes
  • M. F. G. F. Silva
  • P. C. Vieira

Abstract

The response of Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel workers to essential oils, epicuticular wax and hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Eucalyptus maculata was evaluated. Hexane extracts of E. maculata interfered with the recognition mechanism among workers. The main active compounds identified from this plant were the sesquiterpenes elemol and β-eudesmol. These compounds may be responsible for the resistance of this species to ant attack.

Atta sexdens rubropilosa Eucalyptus maculata leaf-cutting ant ant behavioral changes sesquiterpenes 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Adams, R. P. 1995. dentification of Essential Oil Components by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy. Allured, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Anjos, N. and Santana, D. L. Q. 1994. Alterações delet´erias no comportamento de Atta laevigata (F. Smith) e Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), causadas por folhas de Eucalyptus spp. Soc. Entom. Brasil 23:25–30.Google Scholar
  3. Boyd, N. D. and Martin, M. M. 1975. Faecal proteinases of the fungus-growing ant Atta texana: Their fungal origin and ecological significance. Insect Physiol. 21:1815–1820.Google Scholar
  4. Bueno, O. C., Hebling-beraldo, M. J. A., Silva, O. A., Pagnocca, F. C., Fernand es, J. B., and Vieira, P. C. 1990. Toxic effect of plants on leaf-cutting ants and their symbiotic fungus, pp. 420–426, in R. K. Vander Meer, K. Jaffe, and A. Cedeno (eds. ). Applied Myrmecology: A World Perspective. Westview, Boulder, CO.Google Scholar
  5. Carlin, N. F. and H¨olldobler, B. 1987. The kin recognition system of carpenter ants (Camponotus spp. ) II. Larger colonies. Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 20:209–217.Google Scholar
  6. Chen, T. K., Wiemer, D. F., and Howard, J. J. 1984. A volatile leafcutter ant repellent from Astronium graveolens. Naturwissenschaften 71:97–98.Google Scholar
  7. Chou, T. S., Lee, S. J., and Yao, N. K. 1989. Total synthesis of racemic selina-3, 7(11)-diene,á-silenene and á-eudesmol. Tetrahedron 45:4113–4124.Google Scholar
  8. Crozier, R. H.s and Dix, M. W. 1979. Analysis of two generic models for the innate components of colony odour in social Hymenoptera. Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 4:217–224.Google Scholar
  9. Della lucia, T. M. C. and Fowler, H. G. 1993. As formigas cortadeiras, pp. 1–3, in T. M. C. Della Lucia (ed. ). As Formigas Cortadeiras. Folha de Viçosa, Viçosa, Brazil.Google Scholar
  10. Della lucia, T. M. C., Vilela, E. F., Anjos, N., and Moreira, D. D. O. 1993. Criação de formigas cortadeiras em laborat´orio, pp. 151–162, in T. M. C. DELLA LUCIA (ed. ). As Formigas Cortadeiras. Folha de Viçosa, Viçosa, Brazil.Google Scholar
  11. Dool, H. Van Den and Kratz, P. D. 1963. A generalization of the retention index system including linear temperature programmed gas-liquid partition chromatography. J. Chromatogr. 11:463–471.Google Scholar
  12. Febvay, G., Bourgeois, P., and Kermarrec, A. 1985. Antiappé tants pour la fourmi attini, Acromyrmex octospinosus (Reich) (Hymenoptera, Formicidae), chez certaines especies d'ignames (Dioscoreaceae) cultiv´ees aux Antilles. Agronomie 5:439–444.Google Scholar
  13. Hebling, M. J. A., Bueno, O. C., Pagnocca, F. C., Da silva, O. A., and Maroti, P. S. 2000. Toxic effects of Canavalia ensiformis L. (Leguminosae) on laboratory colonies of Atta sexdens L. (Hym., Formicidae). J. Appl. Ent. 124:33–35.Google Scholar
  14. Hebling, M. J. A., Maroti, P. S., Bueno, O. C., Da silva, O. A., and Pagnocca, F. C. 1996.Toxic effects of leaves of Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae) to laboratory nests of Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Bull. Ent. Res. 86:253–256.Google Scholar
  15. Hernand ez, J. V., Lopez, H., and Jaff´e, K. 2002. Nestmate recognition signals of the leaf-cuttingant Atta laevigata. J. Insect Physiol. 48:287–295.Google Scholar
  16. Hubbell, S. P. and Wiemer, D. F. 1983. Host plant selection by an attineant, pp. 233–254, in P. Jaisson (ed. ). Social Insects in the Tropics, Vol. 2. University of Paris Press, Paris.Google Scholar
  17. Jolad, S. D., Timmermann, B. N., Hoffmann, J. J., Bates, R. B., Camou, F. A., and Siahaan, T. J. 1988. Sesquiterpenes glycosides and an acetogenin glucoside from Lessingia gland ulifera. Phytochemistry 27:2199–2204.Google Scholar
  18. Jutsum, A. R., Saunders, R. S., and Cherrett, J. M. 1979. Intraspecific aggression in the leaf-cuttingant Acromyrmex octospinosus. Anim. Behav. 27:839–844.Google Scholar
  19. Lahav, S., Soroker, V., and Hefetz, A. 1999. Direct behavioral evidence for hydrocarbons as ant recognition discriminators. Naturwissenchaften 86:246–249.Google Scholar
  20. Lenoir, A., Fresneau, D., Errard, C., and Hefetz, A. 1999. Individuality and colonial identity in ants: The emergence of social representation concept, pp. 219–237, in C. Detrain, J. L. Deneuborg, and J. M. Pasteels (eds.). Information Processing in Social Insects, 432 pp. Birkhauser Verlag, Basel, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  21. Martin, M. M., Boyd, N. D., Gieselmann, M. J., and Silver, R. G. 1975. Activity of faecal fluid of a leaf-cutting ant toward plant cell wall polysaccharides. J. Insect Physiol. 21:1887–1892.Google Scholar
  22. Martin, M. M., Carman, R. M., and Macconnel, J. G. 1969. Nutrients derived from the fungus cultured by the fungus-growing ant Atta colombica tonsipes. Ann. Ent. Soc. Am. 62:11–13.Google Scholar
  23. Santana, D. L. Q., Della lucia, T. M. C., and Zanuncio, J. C. 1990. Influência do formato de amostras de folhas de Eucalyptus spp. na atratividade a formigas cortadeiras Atta spp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). An. Soc. Entom. Brasil 19:72–80.Google Scholar
  24. Silva, A., Bacci, M., JR., Siqueira, C. G., Bueno, O. C., Pagnocca, F. C., and Hebling, M. J. A. 2003. Survival of Atta sexdens workers on different food sources. J. Insect Physiol. 49:307–311.Google Scholar
  25. Siqueira, J. D. P. 1990. A atividade florestal como um dos instrumentos de desenvolvimento do Brasil, pp. 15–18, in Congresso Florestal Brasileiro, VI. Campos do Jordão, SP. Anais.Google Scholar
  26. Su, W.-C., Fang, J.-M., and Cheng, Y.-S. 1995. Sesquiterpenes from leaves of Cryptomeria japonica. Phytochemistry 39:603–607.Google Scholar
  27. Viana, A. M. M., FrÉzard, A., Malosse, C., Della lucia, T. M. C., Errard, C., and Lenoi R, A. 2001. Colonial recognition of fungus in the fungus-growing ant Acromyrmex subterraneus subterraneus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Chemoecology 11:29–36.Google Scholar
  28. Weber, N. A. 1972. Gardeningants, the Attines. Am. Philos. Soc. XX:146.Google Scholar
  29. Wiemer, D. F. 1985. Natural repellents of the leaf cutting ants. Rev. Latinoam. Quim. 16:98–102.Google Scholar
  30. Wilson, E. O. 1980. Caste and division of labor in leaf-cutter ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Atta). Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 7:l43–l56.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. MarsaroJr.
    • 1
  • R. C. Souza
    • 2
  • T. M. C. Della Lucia
    • 1
  • J. B. Fernandes
    • 2
  • M. F. G. F. Silva
    • 2
  • P. C. Vieira
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Biologia AnimalUniversidade Federal de ViçosaViçosaBrazil
  2. 2.Departamento de QuímicaUniversidade Federal de São CarlosSão CarlosBrazil

Personalised recommendations