Advertisement

Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 867–879 | Cite as

Bioactivity of Phenanthrenes from Juncus acutus on Selenastrum capricornutum

  • Marina Dellagreca
  • Marina Isidori
  • Margherita Lavorgna
  • Pietro Monaco
  • Lucio Previtera
  • Armando Zarrelli
Article

Abstract

Twenty-five 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes, four phenanthrenes, a dihydrodibenzoxepin, and a pyrene, isolated from the wetland plant Juncus acutus, were tested to detect their effects on the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum. Nine of the compounds were isolated and identified for the first time. Most of the compounds caused inhibition of algal growth. The 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes 1, 5, 21, and 22 were the most active.

Juncus acutus dihydrophenanthrenes phenanthrenes dihydrodibenzoxepin pyrene algiecides Selenastrum capricornutum 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. American Society FOR Testing AND Materials. 1998. Standard Practice for Algal Growth Potential Testing with Selenastrum capicornutum. ASTM D3978–80, PA, USA.Google Scholar
  2. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Isidori, M., Lavorgna, M., Monaco, P., Previtera, L., and Zarrelli, A. 2002. Phenanthrenoids from the wetland Juncus acutus. Phytochemistry 60:633–638.Google Scholar
  3. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Isidori, M., and Zarrelli, A. 2001a. Toxicity evaluation of natural and synthetic phenanthrenes in aquatic systems. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 20:1824–1830.Google Scholar
  4. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Molinaro, A., Monaco, P., and Previtera, L. 1993a. A bioactive dihydrodibenzoxepin from Juncus effusus. Phytochemistry 34:1182–1184.Google Scholar
  5. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Molinaro, A., Monaco, P., and Previtera, L. 1993b. Cytotoxic 9,10-dihydrophenanthrenes from Juncus effusus. Tetrahedron 49:3425–3432.Google Scholar
  6. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Monaco, P., Pinto, G., Pollio, A., and Previtera, L. 1996. Action of antialgal compounds from Juncus effusus L. on Selenastrum capricornutum. J. Chem. Ecol. 22:587–603.Google Scholar
  7. DdllaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Monaco, P., Pinto, G., Pollio, A., and Previtera, L. 1997. Minor bioactive dihydrophenanthrenes from Juncus effusus. J. Nat. Prod. 60:1265–1268.Google Scholar
  8. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Monaco, P., Pollio, A., Previtera, L., and Zarrelli, A. 2000. Dihydrophenanthrene and phenanthrene mimics of natural compounds—Synthesis and antialgal activity. J. Chem. Ecol. 26:587–599.Google Scholar
  9. DellaGreca, M., Fiorentino, A., Monaco, P., Pinto, G., Previtera, L., and Zarrelli, A. 2001b. Synthesis and antialgal activity of dihydrophenanthrenes and phenanthrenes II: Mimics of natural occurring compounds in Juncus effusus. J. Chem. Ecol. 27:257–271.Google Scholar
  10. Ervin, G. N. and Wetzel, R. G. 2000. Allelochemical autotoxicity in the emergent wetland macrophyte Juncus effusus (Juncaceae). Am. J. Bot. 87:853–860.Google Scholar
  11. International Organization for Standardization. 1989. Water quality—Algal growth inhibition test. ISO 8692, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  12. Nyholm, N. and KÄllqvist, T. 1989. Methods for growth inhibition toxicity tests with freshwater algae. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 8:689–703.Google Scholar
  13. Organization FOR Economic Cooperation AND Development. 1994. Algal growth inhibition test. OECD Guideline 201, Paris, France.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marina Dellagreca
    • 1
  • Marina Isidori
    • 2
  • Margherita Lavorgna
    • 2
  • Pietro Monaco
    • 2
  • Lucio Previtera
    • 1
  • Armando Zarrelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Chimica Organica e BiochimicaUniversità Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. AngeloNapoliItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Scienze della VitaSeconda Università di NapoliCasertaItaly

Personalised recommendations