Use of Simple Exercise Tools by Students with Multiple Disabilities: Impact of Automatically Delivered Stimulation on Activity Level and Mood

  • Giulio E. Lancioni
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
  • Mark F. O'Reilly
  • Doretta Oliva
  • Francesca Campodonico
  • Jop Groeneweg
Article

Abstract

This study assessed the impact of automatically delivered stimulation on the activity level and mood (indices of happiness) of two students with multiple disabilities, during their use of a stationary bicycle and a stepper. The stimulation involved a pool of favorite stimulus events which were delivered automatically, through an electronic control system, while the students were active in using the aforementioned exercise tools. Data showed that stimulation had a positive impact on the overall level of activity and indices of happiness of both students. Practical implications and technical aspects of the intervention procedure are discussed.

exercise tools multiple disabilities automatically delivered simulation activity mood 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giulio E. Lancioni
    • 1
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 2
  • Mark F. O'Reilly
    • 3
  • Doretta Oliva
    • 4
  • Francesca Campodonico
    • 4
  • Jop Groeneweg
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeidenLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.ONE Research InstituteChesterfieldVirginia
  3. 3.University of TexasAustin
  4. 4.Lega F. D'Oro Research CenterOsimoItaly

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