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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 105–116 | Cite as

Emotion-Focused Therapy: An Interview with Leslie Greenberg

  • Denise M. Sloan
Article
  • 404 Downloads

Abstract

Over the past 30 years Leslie Greenberg has developed and refined the Emotion-Focused Therapy (EFT) approach. This therapy model stands apart from other, humanistic-based approaches in its focus on empiricism. In addition, EFT is one of the few therapy models that is truly integrative in nature, combining client-centered, gestalt, and cognitive principles. This paper includes a recent interview with Greenberg in which he describes the development of EFT and his views regarding future directions of EFT, as well as his views on the field of psychotherapy more generally.

psychotherapy emotion experiential humanistic integrative 

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REFERENCES

  1. Greenberg, L. S. (in press). Emotion coaching. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association Press.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise M. Sloan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphia

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