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Comparison of Mothers', Fathers', and Teachers' Reports on Problem Behavior in 5- to 6-Year-Old Children

  • Hans Grietens
  • Patrick Onghena
  • Peter Prinzie
  • Els Gadeyne
  • Veerle Van Assche
  • Pol Ghesquière
  • Walter Hellinckx
Article

Abstract

Evidence exists that there is low agreement between multiple informants reporting on children's and adolescents' behavior problems. Few studies, however, focus on agreement between informants in specific age groups. This study examined correspondence and disagreement between mother, father, and teacher reports of problem behavior by analyzing CBCL and TRF data of 2 nonclinical samples of 5- to 6-year-old preschool children (N = 424). Findings indicated that interrater agreement was low to moderate. This was shown by the intercorrelations, the explained variance in regression analyses and the little overlap in the number of children rated as behaviorally disturbed by all 3 informants. Agreement between mother and father reports was highest, whereas agreement between mother and teacher reports was lowest. Disagreement between informants was highest for internalizing problems. Potential explanations for the lack of agreement are discussed. Guidelines are formulated to refine assessment and optimize clinical decision-making processes.

problem behavior CBCL TRF parent–teacher agreement 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Grietens
    • 1
  • Patrick Onghena
    • 2
  • Peter Prinzie
    • 1
  • Els Gadeyne
    • 3
  • Veerle Van Assche
    • 1
  • Pol Ghesquière
    • 1
  • Walter Hellinckx
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Disability, Special Needs Education, and Child CareUniversity of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Centre for Methodology of Educational ResearchUniversity of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Centre for School Effectiveness and EvaluationUniversity of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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