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The Use of the MMPI-2 Infrequency–Psychopathology Scale in the Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Male Veterans

  • David F. Tolin
  • Nicholas Maltby
  • Frank W. Weathers
  • Brett T. Litz
  • Jeffrey Knight
  • Terence M. Keane
Article

Abstract

This study evaluated the use of the FP (Infrequency–Psychopathology) scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory—2 (MMPI-2) as a measure of symptom overreporting among 423 service-seeking male veterans with and without PTSD. Results were consistent with several predictions based on the logic of the FP scale. FP produced lower scores for PTSD and non-PTSD patients than the other two MMPI-2 measures of infrequent responding; F and FB. FP also resulted in fewer invalid protocols than did F or FB. Finally, FP yielded lower correlations with MMPI-2 and other measures of psychopathology than did F or FB. Consistent with previous studies, compensation-seeking status was associated with extreme elevations across clinical and validity scales. Contrary to previous findings, however, compensation-seeking veterans were also more likely to receive a PTSD diagnosis. Implications for the relationship between compensation seeking and symptom overreporting are discussed.

MMPI-2 Fp posttraumatic stress disorder symptom overreporting 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • David F. Tolin
    • 1
  • Nicholas Maltby
    • 1
  • Frank W. Weathers
    • 2
  • Brett T. Litz
    • 3
  • Jeffrey Knight
    • 3
  • Terence M. Keane
    • 3
  1. 1.The Institute of Living
  2. 2.Auburn UniversityEast Alabama
  3. 3.National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare SystemBoston University School of MedicineBoston

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