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Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 145–172 | Cite as

The Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Middle School, Mathematics Teachers in China and the U.S.

  • Shuhua An
  • Gerald Kulm
  • Zhonghe Wu
Article

Abstract

This study compared the pedagogical contentknowledge of mathematics in U.S. and Chinesemiddle schools. The results of thiscomparative study indicated that mathematicsteachers' pedagogical content knowledge in thetwo countries differs markedly, which has adeep impact on teaching practice. The Chineseteachers emphasized developing procedural andconceptual knowledge through reliance ontraditional, more rigid practices, which haveproven their value for teaching mathematicscontent. The United States teachers emphasizeda variety of activities designed to promotecreativity and inquiry in attempting to developstudents' understanding of mathematicalconcepts. Both approaches have benefits andlimitations. The practices of teachers in eachcountry may be partially adapted to helpovercome deficiencies in the other.

pedagogical content knowledge mathematics teaching student's cognition teacher's knowledge unit fraction 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shuhua An
    • 1
  • Gerald Kulm
    • 2
  • Zhonghe Wu
  1. 1.California State UniversityLong BeachUSA, E-mail
  2. 2.Department of TeachingTexas A&M University, Learning and CultureCollege Station

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