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Journal of Insect Conservation

, Volume 8, Issue 2–3, pp 95–107 | Cite as

The United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan moths – selection, status and progress on conservation

  • Mark S. Parsons
Article
  • 55 Downloads

Abstract

As a result of the Earth Summit in 1992, 53 species of moth are covered by the UK Government's Biodiversity Action Plan. The background to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan and the selection of species is discussed. Butterfly Conservation's Action for Threatened Moths Project is covered along with its role and approach in overseeing the implementation of the moth Action Plans. A case study on the Straw Belle Aspitates gilvaria (Denis and Schiffermüller) is presented as an example of how an individual Action Plan is being implemented. A subjective consideration of the biological progress with the moth Action Plans is given along with a brief discussion of possible future developments for the UK BAP approach for moths.

Action plans Aspitates gilvaria Moth Recording 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark S. Parsons
    • 1
  1. 1.Butterfly ConservationManor YardWarehamDorset BH205 QP

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