Journal of Child and Family Studies

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 35–45

The Parents Matter! Program: Building a Successful Investigator-Community Partnership

  • Laura A. Secrest
  • Shana L. Lassiter
  • Lisa P. Armistead
  • Sarah C. Wyckoff
  • Jacqueline Johnson
  • Winona B. Williams
  • Beth A. Kotchick
Article

Abstract

We examine the issues involved in creating and maintaining a successful collaboration between university-based researchers and community members when designing and implementing the Parents Matter! Program (PMP). The roles of focus groups, community advisory boards, and community liaisons are highlighted. PMP provides an illustration of the ongoing process of collaboration between investigators and community members and the benefits and challenges of such a partnership.

Parents Matter! Program community research collaboration prevention intervention 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura A. Secrest
    • 1
  • Shana L. Lassiter
    • 1
  • Lisa P. Armistead
    • 2
  • Sarah C. Wyckoff
    • 3
  • Jacqueline Johnson
    • 4
  • Winona B. Williams
    • 5
  • Beth A. Kotchick
    • 6
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentGeorgia State UniversityAtlanta
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentGeorgia State UniversityAtlanta
  3. 3.Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlanta
  4. 4.Parents Matter ProgramLittle Rock
  5. 5.Parents Matter ProgramLittle Rock
  6. 6.Psychology DepartmentLoyola College in MarylandBaltimore

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