Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 183–211

Caribou Crossings and Cultural Meanings: Placing Traditional Knowledge and Archaeology in Context in an Inuit Landscape

  • Andrew M. Stewart
  • Darren Keith
  • Joan Scottie
Article

Abstract

Meaning is conveyed by context. Northern landscapes associated with oral traditions provide rich contexts for understanding archaeological features and their spatial and temporal distribution. At the same time, traditional knowledge, including place names, is supported by the persistence of an integral archaeological landscape. The lower Kazan River, Nunavut Territory, Canada, preserves a record of land use for a hunting-trapping society in archaeological remains and traditional knowledge. The record shows that traditions of knowledge are manifest in the archaeological landscape. These traditions include commemoration of people and events in monuments, enduring practices (land skills) that are associated with a “traditional” time, and principles of spatial differentiation and orientation based on relations between people and caribou.

historic Inuit archaeology traditional knowledge hunter-gatherer landscapes cultural meaning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew M. Stewart
    • 1
  • Darren Keith
    • 2
  • Joan Scottie
    • 3
  1. 1.ConsultantOntarioCanada
  2. 2.Kitikmeot Heritage SocietyNunavut TerritoryCanada
  3. 3.Inland Inuit ConsultingNunavut TerritoryCanada

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