Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 127–156 | Cite as

Landscapes of the Ghost Dance: A Cartography of Numic Ritual

  • Alex K. Carroll
  • M. Nieves Zedeño
  • Richard W. Stoffle
Article

Abstract

Recent historical and ethnographic research indicates that the study of ritual behavior could be greatly enhanced by combining parameters of place and landscape use with interpretation of material culture. This strategy is especially useful for identifying the archaeological record of ritual among societies that incorporated topographic features and natural resources into their liturgical order. In this article we apply a behavioral framework to the study of Numic ritual technologies. By intergrating ethnographic and historic data on the geography, practice, and material culture of the nineteenth-century Nevada Ghost Dance, we demonstrate how this framework helps to determine the configuration of a ritual place and its position relative to other ritual and nonritual places.

Ghost Dance Nevada Indians ritual technology sacred landscape 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex K. Carroll
    • 1
  • M. Nieves Zedeño
    • 1
  • Richard W. Stoffle
    • 1
  1. 1.Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, Haury BuildingUniversity of ArizonaTucsonArizona

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