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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 121–183 | Cite as

Tiwanaku and Its Precursors: Recent Research and Emerging Perspectives

  • John W. JanusekEmail author
Article

Abstract

The Lake Titicaca Basin provides a fascinating case study for examining the prehistoric rise of complexity and archaic state development. The development of the Tiwanaku state and preceding polities involved conjunctions of regional environmental, socioeconomic, and ideological transformations. Significant social, economic, and ideological diversity characterized each major phase, indicating that the creation of inclusive domains of shared values, practices, and identities was critical to the formation of polities in the region. Tiwanaku and its precursors were, in great part, incorporative sociopolitical phenomena in which social diversity remained vital throughout their histories.

archaeology Andes Tiwanaku sociopolitical development 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyVanderbilt UniversityNashville

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