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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 453–467 | Cite as

Early Language Impairment and Young Adult Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior

  • E. B. Brownlie
  • Joseph H. Beitchman
  • Michael Escobar
  • Arlene Young
  • Leslie Atkinson
  • Carla Johnson
  • Beth Wilson
  • Lori Douglas
Article

Abstract

Clinic and forensic studies have reported high rates of language impairments in conduct disordered and incarcerated youth. In community samples followed to early adolescence, speech and language impairments have been linked to attention deficits and internalizing problems, rather than conduct problems, delinquency, or aggression. This study examines the young adult antisocial outcomes of speech or language impaired children. Language impaired boys had higher levels of parent-rated delinquency symptoms by age 19 than boys without language impairment, controlled for verbal IQ and for demographic and family variables. Language impaired boys did not differ from controls in self-reported delinquency or aggression symptoms on a standardized checklist; however, language impaired boys reported higher rates of arrests and convictions than controls. Language impairment was not related to aggression or delinquency in girls. We examine alternate models of the interrelationships between language, academics, and behavior, at ages 5, 12, and 19.

language impairment delinquency longitudinal community sample 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. B. Brownlie
    • 1
  • Joseph H. Beitchman
    • 2
  • Michael Escobar
    • 3
  • Arlene Young
    • 1
    • 2
  • Leslie Atkinson
    • 2
  • Carla Johnson
    • 4
  • Beth Wilson
    • 2
  • Lori Douglas
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Child, Youth, and Family ProgramCentre for Addiction and Mental HealthTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of StatisticsUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Department of Speech-Language-PathologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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