International Journal of Theoretical Physics

, Volume 43, Issue 1, pp 251–264 | Cite as

Failure of Standard Quantum Mechanics for the Description of Compound Quantum Entities

  • Diederik Aerts
  • Frank Valckenborgh
Article

Abstract

We reformulate the “separated quantum entities” theorem, i.e., the theorem that proves that two separated quantum entities cannot be described by means of standard quantum mechanics, within the fully elaborated operational Geneva–Brussels approach to quantum axiomatics, where the basic mathematical structure is that of a State Property System. We give arguments that show that the core of this result indicates a failure of standard quantum mechanics, and not just some peculiar shortcoming due to the axiomatic approach to quantum mechanics itself.

standard quantum mechanics compound quantum entities 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diederik Aerts
    • 1
  • Frank Valckenborgh
    • 1
  1. 1.Center Leo Apostel (CLEA) and Foundations of the Exact Sciences (FUND), Department of MathematicsBrussels Free UniversityBrusselsBelgium

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