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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 179–196 | Cite as

Behavioral Responses of Gorillas to Habituation in the Dzanga-Ndoki National Park, Central African Republic

  • Allard BlomEmail author
  • Chloe Cipolletta
  • Arend M. H. Brunsting
  • Herbert H. T. Prins
Article

Abstract

We monitored the impact of habituation for tourism through changes in gorillas' behavior during the habituation process at Bai Hokou (Dzanga-Ndoki National Park, Central African Republic) from August 1996 to December 1999. From August 1998 onwards we focused on one gorilla group: the Munye. During the habituation process, it became increasingly easier to locate and to remain with the gorillas. Their initial reactions of aggression, fear and vocalization upon contact were replaced increasingly by ignoring us. Curiosity appeared to be an intermediate stage in the process. The way in which contacts with the Munye ended became more subdued over time. Regular daily contact is important in promoting habituation. Likewise, contacting gorillas while they are in a tree or in dense forest provides positive results compared to open habitat. Contacts within 10 m and contacts without forewarning the gorillas of observer presence, e.g., via tongue clacking, should be avoided. As of December 1999, habituation had progressed well; habituation of western gorillas is feasible. However, the gorillas experience negative effects during the habituation process, showing, for example, an increase in daily path length, and reactions of aggression, fear and vocalization upon contact. Impacts diminish over time. Given these and other potentially negative effects, the decision to begin habituation should not be taken lightly.

gorilla behavior habituation Dzanga-Ndoki Central African Republic 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allard Blom
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Chloe Cipolletta
    • 3
  • Arend M. H. Brunsting
    • 1
  • Herbert H. T. Prins
    • 1
  1. 1.Tropical Nature Conservation and Ecology of Vertebrates, Dept. of Environmental SciencesWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  3. 3.Dzanga-Sangha ProjectWorld Wildlife FundBanguiCentral African Republic

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