International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 24, Issue 6, pp 1301–1357 | Cite as

Assessment of the Diversity of African Primates

  • Peter Grubb
  • Thomas M. Butynski
  • John F. Oates
  • Simon K. Bearder
  • Todd R. Disotell
  • Colin P. Groves
  • Thomas T. Struhsaker
Article

Abstract

This account of the systematics of African primates is the consensus view of a group of authors who attended the Workshop of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group held at Orlando, Florida, in February 2000. We list all species and subspecies that we consider to be valid, together with a selected synonymy for all names that have been controversial in recent years or that have been considered to be valid by other authors in recent publications. For genera, species-groups or species, we tabulate and discuss different published systematic interpretations, with emphasis on more recent publications. We explain why we have adopted our taxonomic treatment and give particular attention to cases where more research is urgently required and in which systematic changes are most likely to be made. For all taxa, from suborder to subspecies, we provide English names.

Africa Primates species subspecies systematics taxonomy 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Grubb
    • 1
  • Thomas M. Butynski
    • 2
  • John F. Oates
    • 3
  • Simon K. Bearder
    • 4
  • Todd R. Disotell
    • 5
  • Colin P. Groves
    • 6
  • Thomas T. Struhsaker
    • 7
  1. 1.LondonUK
  2. 2.Africa Biodiversity Conservation Program, Zoo Atlanta, c/o National Museums of KenyaInstitute of Primate ResearchNairobiKenya
  3. 3.Department of AnthropologyHunter CollegeNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Nocturnal Primate Research Group, Anthropology Department, Social Sciences and LawOxford Brookes UniversityOxfordUK
  5. 5.Department of AnthropologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Department of Prehistory and AnthropologyThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  7. 7.Department of Biological Anthropology and AnatomyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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