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Masshouses and Meetinghouses: The Archaeology of the Penal Laws in Early Modern Ireland

  • Colm J. Donnelly
Article

Abstract

Archaeology has demonstrated that it can provide added insight into the study of early modern Ireland, although there has been a notable tendency for research to concentrate on secular aspects of society. Investigations into the period, however, would benefit from a greater awareness of contemporary religion, since this was a factor that played a major role in political, social, and economic life. An example of this is the introduction of Penal legislation by the Protestant-dominated Irish parliament in the early eighteenth century, directed at those whose religious outlook did not correspond to that of the Established Church.

eighteenth-century Ireland Penal laws Catholicism Presbyterianism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colm J. Donnelly
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork, School of Archaeology and PalaeoecologyQueen's University BelfastBelfastNorthern Ireland

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