Environmental Geochemistry and Health

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 119–128 | Cite as

Changes of Soil Microbiological Properties Caused by Land Use Changing From Rice–Wheat Rotation to Vegetable Cultivation

  • X.G. Lin
  • R. Yin
  • H.Y. Zhang
  • J.F. Huang
  • R.R. Chen
  • Z.H. Cao

Abstract

A survey was done recently in Jiaxing city of Zhejiang Province in the Yangtze River Delta to compare the differences of soil microbiological properties among paddy soils with different land use including continuous open-field vegetable cultivation (OFVC), plastic-greenhouse vegetable cultivation (PGVC) and traditional rice–wheat rotation (RWR). The soil types included are percolating, permeable and waterlogged paddy soils. The results indicate that the microbial flora was markedly changed as the land use changed for all the three soil types. In continuous vegetable cultivation soils, especially in PGVC soils, the bacteria amounts decreased dramatically, but the fungal and actinomyce amounts increased as compared with RWR soils. The dehydrogenase activities decreased significantly in vegetable soils, especially in PGVC soils as compared with RWR soils. The microbial biomass C and the total phospholipid contents (TPL) in vegetable cultivation soil greatly decreased as compared with RWR soils. Biolog analysis indicated that the kinds of carbon sources that could be metabolized by native microbes in PGVC soils greatly decreased as compared with OFVC soils and RWR soils, revealing that microbial diversity had decreased since land use change. The activities of some soil enzymes including urease, invertase and phosphase were all lower in OFVC soils than those in RWR soils, and those in PGVC soils were the lowest. The degradation of microbiological activities in continuous vegetable cultivation soils, especially in PGVC soils, as compared with RWR soils might have been caused by soil acidification and accumulation of salts due to overuse of both organic and inorganic fertilizers in vegetable cultivation.

land use change open-field vegetable cultivation paddy soil plastic-greenhouse vegetable cultivation rice–wheat rotation soil microorganisms 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • X.G. Lin
    • 1
  • R. Yin
    • 2
  • H.Y. Zhang
    • 1
  • J.F. Huang
    • 3
  • R.R. Chen
    • 1
  • Z.H. Cao
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Soil ScienceChinese Academy of SciencesNanjingChina
  2. 2.Institute of Soil ScienceChinese Academy of SciencesNanjingChina; (e-mail:
  3. 3.Soil and Fertilizer Station of JiaxingZhejiang ProvinceChina

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