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Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp 67–96 | Cite as

A Conceptual Framework for Learning to Teach Secondary Mathematics: A Situative Perspective

  • Dominic Peressini
  • Hilda Borko
  • Lew Romagnano
  • Eric Knuth
  • Christine Willis
Article

Abstract

This paper offers for discussion and critique a conceptual framework that applies a situative perspective on learning to the study of learning to teach mathematics. From this perspective, such learning occurs in many different situations -- mathematics and teacher preparation courses, pre-service field experiences, and schools of employment. By participating over time in these varied contexts, mathematics teachers refine their conceptions about their craft -- the big ideas of mathematics, mathematics-specific pedagogy, and sense of self as a mathematics teacher. This framework guides a research project that traces the learning trajectories of teachers from two reform-based teacher preparation programs into their early teaching careers. We provide two examples from this research to illustrate how this framework has helped us understand the process of learning to teach.

Keywords

Teacher Education Mathematics Teacher Prospective Teacher Teacher Education Program Professional Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dominic Peressini
    • 1
  • Hilda Borko
    • 1
  • Lew Romagnano
    • 2
  • Eric Knuth
    • 3
  • Christine Willis
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado at BoulderUSA
  2. 2.The Metropolitan State College of DenverUSA
  3. 3.University of Wisconsin -- MadisonUSA

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