Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 49, Issue 4, pp 594–601 | Cite as

Multichannel Electrogastrography (EGG) in Normal Subjects: A Multicenter Study

  • Hrair P. Simonian
  • Kashyap Panganamamula
  • Henry P. Parkman
  • Xiaohong Xu
  • Jiande Z. Chen
  • Greger Lindberg
  • Hui Xu
  • Chi Shao
  • Mei-Yun Ke
  • Michael Lykke
  • Per Hansen
  • Bjorn Barner
  • Henrik Buhl
Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to record gastric myoelectric activity using multichannel electrogastrography (EGG) and to determine if there are differences due to age, gender, body mass, and study location. In 61 normal subjects from four centers, fasting multichannel EGG was recorded for 1 h, followed by two 1-h postprandial recordings after a test meal. Variables assessed included dominant frequency (DF) and its power, percentage time in 2- to 4-cpm frequency, and percentage slow-wave coupling (%SWC). There were no significant differences in EGG parameters with respect to gender or age. Subjects with a BMI >25 had a decrease in the absolute DF power but a similar increase in the postprandial DF power. Subjects with a BMI >25 had a postprandial decrease in the %SWC compared to those with a BMI <25. There was a decrease in postprandial %SWC in European/Asian centers compared to American centers. In conclusion, multichannel EGG provides assessment of electrical slow-wave coupling in addition to determining dominant frequency, power, and percentage normal rhythm. This multicenter study of normal subjects shows similar multichannel EGG values among different genders and ages. Body mass and ethnicity may impact on some of the EGG values.

electrogastrography gastric motility 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hrair P. Simonian
    • 1
  • Kashyap Panganamamula
    • 1
  • Henry P. Parkman
    • 1
  • Xiaohong Xu
    • 2
  • Jiande Z. Chen
    • 2
  • Greger Lindberg
    • 3
  • Hui Xu
    • 4
  • Chi Shao
    • 4
  • Mei-Yun Ke
    • 4
  • Michael Lykke
    • 5
  • Per Hansen
    • 5
  • Bjorn Barner
    • 5
  • Henrik Buhl
    • 5
  1. 1.Temple University School of Medicine, PhiladelphiaPennsylvania
  2. 2.University of TexasGalvestonUSA
  3. 3.Karolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Peiking Union Medical College HospitalBeijingChina
  5. 5.Medtronic GastroenterologyShoreviewUSA

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