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Biological Invasions

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 83–88 | Cite as

Epiphytic Refugium: Are Two Species of Invading Freshwater Bivalves Partitioning Spatial Resources?

  • Thomas P. Diggins
  • Michael Weimer
  • Kenton M. Stewart
  • Robert E. Baier
  • Anne E. Meyer
  • Robert F. Forsberg
  • Michael A. Goehle
Article

Abstract

Enumeration of benthic (bottom dwelling) and epiphytic (attached to plants) zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis, respectively) at Lake Erie near-shore sites in fall of 2000 revealed an unexpected prevalence of the zebra mussel on submerged plants. Even at Buffalo, New York, USA, where benthic dreissenids have been 92–100% quagga mussel since 1996, zebra mussels constituted 30–61% of epiphytes numerically. This may reflect a partitioning of settling space consistent with interspecific competition. A seasonal epiphytic refugium might allow the zebra mussel to persist even where the benthos is almost exclusively quagga mussel.

Dreissena bugensis Dreissena polymorpha epiphytic spatial partitioning 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas P. Diggins
    • 1
  • Michael Weimer
    • 2
  • Kenton M. Stewart
    • 3
  • Robert E. Baier
    • 4
  • Anne E. Meyer
    • 4
  • Robert F. Forsberg
    • 4
  • Michael A. Goehle
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of BiologyHamilton CollegeUSA
  2. 2.US Fish and Wildlife ServiceLower Great Lakes Fishery Resource OfficeUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesState University of New York at BuffaloUSA
  4. 4.Industry/University Center for BiosurfacesState University of New York at BuffaloUSA
  5. 5.Great Lakes Center for Environmental Research and EducationBuffalo State CollegeUSA

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