Biological Invasions

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 349–356 | Cite as

Invasion Gateways and Corridors in the Carpathian Basin: Biological Invasions in Hungary

  • K. Török
  • Z. Botta-Dukát
  • I. Dancza
  • I. Németh
  • J. Kiss
  • B. Mihály
  • D. Magyar
Article

Abstract

Biological invasions in Hungary are causing severe problems as a result of recent introductions and rapid land use changes. Poorly managed agricultural and rural, disturbed areas, and aquatic ecosystems are the most prone to plant invasions. Dry grasslands and semi-natural forests are less prone to invasions. A few plant species have led to human health (allergenic) problems. Some insect species have caused economic problems to crop production. A number of monitoring networks and control measures are in place for selected plants and insects.

Hungary introduced species invasive species sensitive habitats 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ángyán J, Fésűs I, Podmaniczky L, Tar F and Vajnáné Madarassy A (2000) National Agri-Environmental Programme. Ministry for Agronomy and Rural Development, 174 pp [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  2. Bagi I (1999) Asclepias syriaca; biology and control of an invasive species. Kitaibelia 4: 289–295 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  3. Balázs K and Thúróczy Cs (2000) Parasitism of Cameraria ochridiella Deschka et Dimiè depending on diversity of the environment. Növényvédelem 36: 281–287 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  4. Balogh L (2001) Invasive alien plants threatening the natural vegetation of Űrség Landscape Protection Area (Hungary) In: Brundu G, Brock J, Camarda I, Child L and Wade M (eds) Plant Invasions: Species Ecology and Ecosystem management, pp 185–198. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  5. Bartha D (2000) Adventive taxa of the Hungarian dendroflora. Tilia 9: 232–240 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  6. Béres I and Hunyadi K (1981) Biology of Ambrosia elatior L. Növényvédelem 16(3): 109–116 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  7. Bódis J (1993) The effect of Pinus nigra on open dolomite grasslands. I. Textural changes. Botanikai Közlemények 80: 129–139 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  8. Bódis J, Botta-Dukát Z and Szabó I (1993) Diversity and distribution in herbaceous plant communities. Proceedings of XXXV. Georgikon Conference, Keszthely [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  9. Botta-Dukát Z (1994) Classification of giant goldenrod (Solidago gigantea A.) stands on urban habitats around Keszthely town. In: Mochnacky S and Terpó A(eds) Proceedings of the First International Conference on Antropization and Environment of Rural Settlements. Flora and Vegetation. Sátoraljaújhely, Hungary, 22-26 August 1994. P.J. Šáfárik University, Košice, SlovakiaGoogle Scholar
  10. Botta-Dukát Z and Dancza I (2001) Effect of weather conditions on the growth of Solidago gigantea. In: Brundu G, Brock J, Camarda I, Child L and Wade M (eds) Plant Invasions: Species Ecology and Ecosystem management, pp 47–54. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  11. Böszörményi A and Bagi I (2001) Vegetation dinamics of Xanthium italicum dominated patches in the flood-plain of River Tisza. Kitaibelia 6(1): 45–50 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  12. Brundu G, Brock J, Camarda I, Child L and Wade M (eds) (2001) Plant Invasions: Species Ecology and Ecosystem Management. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands, 338 ppGoogle Scholar
  13. Bürki HM (2000) Maisschädling in der Schweiz schon aufgetaucht. Mediendienst 2487: 19Google Scholar
  14. Csecserits A and Rédei T (2001) Secondary succession on sandy old-fields in Hungary. Journal of Applied Vegetation Science 4: 63–74CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Csontos P (1986) Dispersal and establishment of Impatiens parviflora, an introduced plant, in a hardwood forest. Abstracta Botanica 10: 341–348Google Scholar
  16. Dancza I (1997) Invasion of Heracleum mantegazzianum Somm. et Lev. in the region of Keszthely town in Hungary. Kitaibelia 2(2): 212–213 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  17. Dancza I and Fischl G (2000) Data on the occurrence of yellow-nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L. var. leptostachyus Boeck.) in Keszthely. Acta Agronomica Óváriensis 42(1): 73–80 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  18. Dancza I and Király G (2000) Vorkommen von Senecio inaequidens DC. in Ungarn. Kitaibelia 5(1): 93–109Google Scholar
  19. Dancza I, Almádi L, Botta-Dukát Z and Szabó I (1998) Occurrence of adventive weeds in the eastern part of Zala County (south-west Hungary). Zeitschrift für Pflanzenkrankheiten und Pflanzenschutz 16: 139–140Google Scholar
  20. Edwards CR, Igrc-Barcic J, Berger HK, Festic H, Kiss J, Princzinger G, Schulten G and Vonica I (1998) Overview of the FAO western corn rootworm management program for central Europe. Pflanzenschutzberichte 57: 3–14Google Scholar
  21. Furlan L, Vettorazzo M, Ortez A and Frausin C (1998) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera has already arrived in Italy. Informatore Fitopatologico 12: 43–44Google Scholar
  22. Felföldi L (1990) Identification manual for submersed plants. Vízügyi Hidrobiológia 18. Ministry for Environement and Rural Development, Budapest, 144 pp [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  23. Gondola I (1965) The expansion of Impatiens glandulifera Royle in waterside communities in western Transdanubia. Botanikai Közlemények 52(1): 35–46 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  24. Guti G (2000) Dispersion of Ponto-Caspian gobiid fish (Gobiidae) in the middle Danube basin. Hidrológiai Közlöny 5-6: 303–305 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  25. HBMS, Hungarian Biodiversity Monitoring System (1998) Retrieved from http://www.kvvm.hu/biodiver/index.htm on 22 March 2002Google Scholar
  26. Hill T (1977) The Biology of Weeds. Studies in Biology, No. 7. Arnold Publisher, LondonGoogle Scholar
  27. Jasinka J and Bozsits Gy (1977) Occurrence of sycamore lace bug (Corythuca ciliata) in Hungary. Növényvédelem 13, 42–46 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  28. Kelemen J (ed) (1997) Directives on Nature Conservation Management of Grasslands. Természetbúvár Alapítvány Kiadó, Budapest, 388 pp [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  29. Kiss J and Edwards CR (2001) Crop rotation in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) control. Glasilo Biljne Zastite 1: 15–16 [in Croatian]Google Scholar
  30. Kovács-Láng E, Kröel-Dulay Gy, Kertész M, Fekete G, Bartha S, Mika J, Dobi-Wantouch I, Rédei T, Rajkai K and Hahn I (2000) Changes in the composition of sand grasslands along a climatic gradient in Hungary and implications for climate change. Phytocoenologia 30: 385–407Google Scholar
  31. Kűhalmy T (1994) Encyclopedia of Hunting, p 628. Mezőgazdasági Kiadó [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  32. Kuhlmann U and Vidal S (1999) EU shared-cost RTD action on Western Corn Rootworm: Objectives, Project Workplan and Expected Achievements. Retrieved from http://www.infoland.at/ iwgo/ on 22 March 2002Google Scholar
  33. Mochnacky S and Terpó A (eds) (1994) Antropization and Environment of Rural Settlements. Flora and Vegetation. Proceedings of the First International Conference. Sátoraljaújhely, Hungary, 22-26 August 1994. P.J. Šafárik University, Košice, SlovakiaGoogle Scholar
  34. Moesz G (1909) On some introduced and adventive plant species. Botanikai Közlemények 8: 137–147 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  35. Moesz G (1914) The appearance of the American Oxybaphus nyctagineus Sweet in the flora of Budapest. Botanikai Közlemények 13: 109 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  36. Molnár Zs and Botta-Dukát Z (1998) Improved space-for-time substitution for hypotesis generation: secondary grasslands with documented site history in SE-Hungary. Phytocoenologia 28: 1–29Google Scholar
  37. Nékám K (2001) The allergic society. Magyar Tudomány 108: 1041–1049 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  38. Pénzes A (1928) Eleusine indica (L.) Gärtn., als neue Adventivpflanze in der Flora von Budapest. Magyar Botanikai Lapok 27: 113Google Scholar
  39. Pintér K (1980) Exotic fishes in the Hungarian waters: their importance in fishery utilization of natural water bodies and fish farming. Fish Management 11/4: 163–167Google Scholar
  40. Priszter Sz (1955) Recent expansion of Echinocystis lobata. Botanikai Közlemények 46(1-2): 115–120 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  41. Priszter Sz (1960) The sprerad of adventive weeds. A Keszthelyi Mezőgazdasági Akadémia Kiadványai 7, p 37. Mezőgazdasági Kiadó, Budapest [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  42. Priszter Sz (1997) Research of the Hungarian adventive flora. Botanikai Közlemények 84: 25–32 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  43. Richardson D, Pysek P, Rejmánek M, Barbour M, Panetta D and West C (2000) Naturalization and invasion of alien plants: concepts and definitions. Diversity and Distributions 6: 93–107CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Ripka G, Princzinger G, Zsellér Hatala I, Vasas L, Tóth B and Kiss J (1999) Recent data to the distribution of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) in Hungary. Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica 34(4): 387–392CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Simon T (2000) Identification Manual of the Hungarian Vascular Flora. Tankönyvkiadó, Budapest, 976 ppGoogle Scholar
  46. Sivcev I and Tomasev I (1999) Monitoring of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte in Serbia in 1999. Retrieved from http://www.infoland.at/iwgo/ on 22 March 2002Google Scholar
  47. Solymosi P (1992) Naturalised and recently introduced (adventive) plants in Hungary. Növényvédelem 28(1): 9–21 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  48. Somlyay L and Lőkös L (2000) Polycarpon tetraphyllum L. in Hungary, and new data for the weed flora of Budapest. Kitaibelia 5(2): 305–306 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  49. Szigetvári Cs (1999) The recent state of the non-indigenous sandbur (Cenchrus incertus M.A. Curtis) in the semi-natural sand grasslands near Fülöpháza. Kitaibelia 4: 341–342 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  50. Szabó I (1998) Thermophilous macrophytes of the thermal waters at Hévíz and Keszthely. Kitaibelia 3: 295–297 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  51. Tamás J (2001) Considerations the spread of invasive species illustrated by a case study of Hungary (Conyza canadensis). Botanikai Közlemények 86-87(1-2): 169–181 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  52. Terpó A (1983) Weed species in the genus Panicum. Kertgazdaság 15(3): 31–35 [in Hungarian with English summary]Google Scholar
  53. Terpó A (1995) The occurrence of Heracleum species in Europe. Proceedings of Növényvédelmi Fórum, Keszthely, January 26-27, 1995. Georgikon University, Keszthely, Hungary [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  54. Terpó A (1998) A Senecio inaequidens (S. reclinatus) terjedése. Botanikai Közlemények 85(1-2): 158–159 [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  55. Tóth á and Szabó J (1998) Monitoring of allergenic weeds, with special attention to Ambrosia elatior in Budapest. Proceedings of the 6th EWRS Mediterranean Symposium, pp 244–245. ENSAM INRA, Montpellier, FranceGoogle Scholar
  56. Tóth Á, Benécs-Bárdi G and Balázs Gy (1999) Results of national weed surveys in arable land during the past 50 years in Hungary. Proceedings of the Crop Protection Conference, Brighton, pp 805–810. British Crop Protection Council, LondonGoogle Scholar
  57. Török K (ed) (1997) Hungarian Biodiversity Monitoring System IV. Plant Species. Magyar Természettudományi Múzeum, Budapest, 140 pp [in Hungarian]Google Scholar
  58. Udvardy L (1998a) Classification of adventives dangerous to the Hungarian natural flora. Acta Botanica Hungarica 41: 315–331Google Scholar
  59. Udvardy L (1998b) Spreading and coenological circumstances of the tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) in Hungary. Acta Botanica Hungarica 41: 299–314Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Török
    • 1
  • Z. Botta-Dukát
    • 1
  • I. Dancza
    • 2
  • I. Németh
    • 3
  • J. Kiss
    • 3
  • B. Mihály
    • 4
  • D. Magyar
    • 5
  1. 1.Institute of Ecology and Botany of Hungarian Academy of SciencesVácrátótHungary
  2. 2.Central Service for Plant Protection and Soil ConservationBudapestHungary
  3. 3.Department of Plant ProtectionSzent István UniversityGödöllHungary
  4. 4.Authority for Nature Conservation of the Ministry for EnvironmentBudapestHungary
  5. 5.Department of Plant PathologyPlant Protection Institute of the Hungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary

Personalised recommendations