Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 20, pp 1549–1555 | Cite as

Viability, ultrastructure and cytokinin metabolism of free and immobilized tobacco chloroplasts

  • Lenka Polanská
  • Anna Vičánková
  • Petre I. Dobrev
  • Ivana Macháv cková
  • Radomíra Vaňková
Article

Abstract

Cytokinins play a decisive role in regulation of plastid development and differentiation, but their metabolism in plastids is not known. Metabolic studies using intact chloroplasts are prevented by their instability once they are isolated from leaf cells. Chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1 were therefore immobilized into low-viscosity alginate. Their intactness was assessed by a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase assay which indicated that free chloroplasts totally disintegrated within 7 h, while more than 50% of immobilized chloroplasts remained intact after 24 h. The immobilization had no marked impact on ultrastructure and postponed final destruction. The metabolite profile was similar in free and immobilized chloroplasts after 4 h incubation with tritiated zeatin. Nevertheless, the yield of conversion products decreased twice in immobilized chloroplasts, which was probably the outcome of mass transfer limitations and/or the sorption to polysaccharide matrix.

calcium alginate chloroplast ultrastructure cytokinin metabolism immobilization Nicotiana tabacum 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lenka Polanská
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anna Vičánková
    • 1
  • Petre I. Dobrev
    • 1
  • Ivana Macháv cková
    • 1
  • Radomíra Vaňková
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Experimental Botany AS CRLysolajeCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Plant PhysiologyCharles University, Faculty of SciencePrague 2Czech Republic

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