Advertisement

Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 13, pp 1037–1041 | Cite as

Chitosan sponges as tissue engineering scaffolds for bone formation

  • Yang-Jo Seol
  • Jue-Yeon Lee
  • Yoon-Jeong Park
  • Yong-Moo Lee
  • Young -Ku
  • In-Chul Rhyu
  • Seung-Jin Lee
  • Soo-Boo Han
  • Chong-Pyoung Chung
Article

Abstract

Rat calvarial osteoblasts were grown in porous chitosan sponges fabricated by freeze drying. The prepared chitosan sponges had a porous structure with a 100–200 μm pore diameter, which allowed cell proliferation. Cell density, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition were monitored for up to 56 d culture. Cell numbers were 4 × 106 (day 1), 11 × 106 (day 28) and 12 × 106 (day 56) per g sponge. Calcium depositions were 9 (day 1), 40 (day 28) and 48 (day 56) μg per sponge. Histological results corroborated that bone formation within the sponges had occurred. These results show that chitosan sponges can be used as effective scaffolding materials for tissue engineered bone formation in vitro.

bone formation chitosan sponges osteoblast tissue engineering 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aronow MA, Gerstenfeld LC, Owen TA, Tassinari MS, Stein GS, Lian JB (1990) Factors that promote progressive development of the osteoblast phenotype in cultured fetal rat calvaria cells. J. Cell Physiol. 143: 213–221.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Bellows CG, Aubin JE, Heersche JN, Antosz ME (1986) Mineralized bone nodules formed in vitro from enzymatically released rat calvaria cell populations. Calcif. Tissue Int. 38: 143–154.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Kawase M, Michibayashi N, Nakashima Y, Kurikawa N, Yagi K, Mizoguchi T (1997) Application of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked chitosan as a scaffold for hepatocyte attachment. Biol. Pharm. Bull. 20: 708–710.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Koyano T, Minoura N, Nagura M, Kobayashi K (1998) Attachment and growth of cultured fibroblast cells on PVA/chitosan-blended hydrogels. J. Biomed. Mat. Res. 39: 486–490.Google Scholar
  5. Ma PX, Choi JW (2001) Biodegradable polymer scaffolds with well-defined interconnected spherical pore network. Tissue Eng. 7: 23–33.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Mao JS, Zhao LG, Yin YJ, Yao KD (2003) Structure and properties of bilayer chitosan-gelatin scaffolds. Biomaterials 24: 1067–1074.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Mikos AG, Sarakinos G, Leite SM, Vacanti JP, Langer R (1993) Laminated three-dimensional biodegradable foams for use in tissue engineering. Biomaterials 14: 323–330.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Murphy WL, Kohn DH, Mooney DJ (2000) Growth of continuous bonelike mineral within porous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds in vitro. J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 50: 50–58.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Muzzarelli RA, Mattioli-Belmonte M, Tietz C, Biagini R, Ferioli G, Brunelli MA, Fini M, Giardino R, Ilari P, Biagini G (1994) Stimulatory effect on bone formation exerted by a modified chitosan. Biomaterials 15: 1075–1081.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Vacanti CA, Langer R, Schloo B, Vacanti JP (1991) Synthetic polymers seeded with chondrocytes provide a template for new cartilage formation. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 88: 753–759.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Wang JW, Hon MH (2003) Sugar-mediated chitosan/poly(ethylene glycol)-beta-dicalcium pyrophospate composite: mechanical and microstructural properties. J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 64A: 262–272.Google Scholar
  12. Yin Y, Ye F, Cui J, Zhang F, Li X, Yao K (2003) Preparation and characterization of macroporous chitosan-gelatin/beta-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. J. Biomed. Mater. Res. 67A: 844–855.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yang-Jo Seol
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jue-Yeon Lee
    • 3
  • Yoon-Jeong Park
    • 4
  • Yong-Moo Lee
    • 1
  • Young -Ku
    • 1
  • In-Chul Rhyu
    • 1
    • 4
  • Seung-Jin Lee
    • 3
  • Soo-Boo Han
    • 1
  • Chong-Pyoung Chung
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Periodontology, College of DentistrySeoul National UniversityChongno-Ku, SeoulSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of Periodontology, Samsung Medical CenterSungkyunkwan University School of MedicineKangnam-Ku, SeoulSouth Korea
  3. 3.College of PharmacyEwha Womans UniversitySeodaemun-Ku, SeoulSouth Korea
  4. 4.Department of Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Science, College of DentistrySeoul National UniversityChongno-Ku, SeoulSouth Korea

Personalised recommendations