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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 10, pp 803–806 | Cite as

Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Pichia anomala

  • Feng Pan
  • Qingxiang Yang
  • Yu Zhang
  • Shujun Zhang
  • Min Yang
Article

Abstract

Pichia anomala 2.2540, isolated from soil contaminated by crude oil, degraded naphthalene, dibenzothiophene, phenanthrene and chrysene, both singly and in combination. The yeast degraded 4.5 mg naphthalene l−1 within 24 h. Phenanthrene was degraded after a lag of 24 h. When a mixture of all four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was treated at either 0.1–1.6 mg l−1 or 3.1–5.3 mg l−1, naphthalene was completely degraded first within 24 h, followed by phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene after 48 h. Chrysene, which remained in the mixture even after 96 h, could be degraded along with naphthalene. Chrysene at 0.7 and 1 mg l−1, in the presence of 4.3 and 65 mg naphthalene l−1, respectively, was removed within 96 h.

cometabolism degradation polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons yeast 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Feng Pan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qingxiang Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yu Zhang
    • 1
  • Shujun Zhang
    • 1
  • Min Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-environmental SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP.R. China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control Technology of Henan ProvinceXinxiang, HenanP.R. China

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