Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 8, pp 645–647

Biosensor based on Langmuir–Blodgett films of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) for detection of galactose in human blood

  • Sandeep K. Sharma
  • Rahul Singhal
  • B.D. Malhotra
  • Neeta Sehgal
  • Ashok Kumar
Article
  • 117 Downloads

Abstract

An amperometric biosensor was developed to estimate galactose in human blood serum. Monolayers of poly(3-hexyl thiophene) were placed on glass plates coated with indium tin oxide formed by dispensing a mixed solution of stearic acid in chloroform on to a water sub-phase. Galactose oxidase was mixed with poly(3-hexyl thiophene)/stearic acid in chloroform and dispensed on to the air-water interface of Langmuir–Blodgett trough. These monolayers were transferred on to glass plates which were used as working electrodes with platinum as a reference electrode. The amperometric galactose biosensor thus fabricated had a linear response from 0.05 to 0.5 g galactose l−1 in blood serum. The normal level in blood is < 0.05 g galactose l−1 in adults and 0–0.2 g galactose l−1 in infants. In case of galactosemia, this increases to above 0.2 g galactose l−1 in infants.

biosensor galactose galactosemia Langmuir–Blodgett films poly(3-hexyl thiophene) 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Croisetière LR, Rouillon R, Carpentier (2001) A simple mediatorless amperometric method using the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis for the detection of phytotoxic pollutants. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 56: 261-264.Google Scholar
  2. Hann RA (1990) Molecular structures and monolayer properties. In: Roberts G, ed. Langmuir-Blodgett Films. New York: Plenum, pp. 17-83.Google Scholar
  3. Petry K, Reichardt J (1998) The fundamental importance of human galactose metabolism: lessons from genetics and biochemistry. Trends Genet. 14: 98-102.Google Scholar
  4. Petty MC (1991) Application of multiplayer films to molecular sensors: some examples of bioengineering at the molecular level. J. Biomed. Eng. 13: 209-214.Google Scholar
  5. Rajendran V, Lrudayaraj J (2002) Detection of glucose, galactose and lactose in milk with a microdialysis-coupled flow injection amperometric sensor. J. Dairy Sci. 85: 1357-1361.Google Scholar
  6. Schumacher D, Vogel J, Lerde LI (1994) Construction and application of enzyme electrode for determination of galactose and galactose containing saccharides. Biosens. Bioelectron. 9: 85-90.Google Scholar
  7. Segal S (2001) In vivo evidence of brain galactitol accumulation in an infant with galactosemia and encephalopathy. J. Pediat. 138: 260-262.Google Scholar
  8. Suzanne LW, Robert R, Jie C, Yager C, Segal S (2002) Metabolism of 13C galactose by lymphoblasts from patients with galactosemia determined by NMR spectroscopy. Mol. Genet. Metabol. 77: 296-303.Google Scholar
  9. Szabo EE, Adanyi N, Varadi M (1996) Application of biosensor for monitoring galactose content. Biosens. Bioelectron. 11: 1051-1058.Google Scholar
  10. Watanbe N, Kawasaki S (1987) Determination of galactose in human plasma by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Biomed. Chromatogr. 2: 95-98.Google Scholar
  11. Wilkins JR (1978) Use of platinum electrodes for the electrochemical detection of bacteria. Appl. Env. Microbiol. 36: 683-687.Google Scholar
  12. Worthington V (1972) Worthington Enzyme Manual. Freehold, NJ: Worthington Biochemical Corporation, pp. 21-22.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandeep K. Sharma
    • 1
  • Rahul Singhal
    • 2
  • B.D. Malhotra
    • 2
  • Neeta Sehgal
    • 3
  • Ashok Kumar
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Genomics and Integrative BiologyDelhiIndia
  2. 2.National Physical LaboratoryNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.Department of ZoologyUniversity of DelhiDelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations