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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 7, pp 569–574 | Cite as

Selective antimicrobial activity of chitosan on beer spoilage bacteria and brewing yeasts

  • Gabriela Gil
  • Silvana del Mónaco
  • Patricia Cerrutti
  • Miguel Galvagno
Article

Abstract

Chitosan (0.1 g l−1), assayed in a simple medium, reduced the viability of four lactic acid bacteria isolated during the beer production process by 5 logarithmic cycles, whereas activity against seven commercial brewing yeasts required up to 1 g chitosan l−1. Antimicrobial activity was inversely affected by the pH of the assay medium. In brewery wort, chitosan (0.1 g l−1) selectively inhibited bacterial growth without altering yeast viability or fermenting performance.

brewing process chitosan selective antimicrobial activity 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriela Gil
    • 1
  • Silvana del Mónaco
    • 1
  • Patricia Cerrutti
    • 1
  • Miguel Galvagno
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratorio de Microbiología Industrial, Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de IngenieríaUniversidad de Buenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.Laboratorio de Microbiología Industrial, Pabellón de Industrias, Ciudad UniversitariaConsejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET)Buenos AiresArgentina

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