Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 6, pp 487–491 | Cite as

Growth promotion of red pepper plug seedlings and the production of gibberellins by Bacillus cereus, Bacillus macroides and Bacillus pumilus

  • Gil-Jae Joo
  • Young-Mog Kim
  • In-Jung Lee
  • Kyung-Sik Song
  • In-Koo Rhee

Abstract

The growth of red pepper plug seedlings was promoted by Bacillus cereus MJ-1, B. macroides CJ-29, and B. pumilus CJ-69 isolated from the rhizosphere. Gibberellins (GAs), a well-known plant growth-promoting hormone, were detected in the culture broth of their rhizobacteria. Among the GAs, the contents of GA1, GA3, GA4, and GA7, physiologically active GAs, were comparatively higher than those of others, suggesting that the growth promoting effect was originated from the GAs. This is the first report on the production of GA5, GA8, GA34, GA44, and GA53 by bacteria.

Bacillus gibberellins plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria red-pepper 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gil-Jae Joo
    • 1
  • Young-Mog Kim
    • 1
  • In-Jung Lee
    • 2
  • Kyung-Sik Song
    • 3
  • In-Koo Rhee
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Agricultural Science & TechnologyKorea
  2. 2.Division of Plant BioscienceKyungpook National UniversityDaeguKorea
  3. 3.Division of Applied Biology and ChemistryKyungpook National UniversityDaeguKorea

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