Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 153–157 | Cite as

Heavy metal tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing cysteine synthase

  • Cintia Goulart Kawashima
  • Masaaki Noji
  • Michimi Nakamura
  • Yasumitsu Ogra
  • Kazuo T. Suzuki
  • Kazuki Saito

Abstract

Cysteine synthase [O-acetyl-l-serine(thiol)lyase] catalyzes the final step for l-cysteine biosynthesis in plants. The tolerance of transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing cysteine synthase cDNA in cytosol (3F), chloroplasts (4F) and in both organelles (F1) was investigated towards heavy metals such as Cd, Se, Ni, Pb and Cu. The transgenic plants were significantly more tolerant than wild-type plants in agar medium containing Cd, Se and Ni. The F1 transgenic plants had a higher resistance than other transgenic lines towards these metals and could enhance accumulation of Cd in shoot. These results suggest that the transgenic plants over-expressing cysteine synthase both in cytosol and chloroplasts can be applicable to phyto-remediation of Cd from contaminated soils.

cysteine biosynthesis heavy metal tolerance phytochelatin phytoremediation transgenic plants 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cintia Goulart Kawashima
    • 1
  • Masaaki Noji
    • 1
  • Michimi Nakamura
    • 1
  • Yasumitsu Ogra
    • 2
  • Kazuo T. Suzuki
    • 2
  • Kazuki Saito
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical SciencesChiba UniversityInage-ku, ChibaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Toxicology and Environmental Health Graduate School of Pharmaceutical SciencesChiba UniversityInage-ku, ChibaJapan

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