Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 25, Issue 23, pp 1977–1981 | Cite as

Immobilization of Pseudomonas delafieldii with magnetic polyvinyl alcohol beads and its application in biodesulfurization

  • Guo-bin Shan
  • Jian-min Xing
  • Ming-fang Luo
  • Hui-zhou Liu
  • Jia-yong Chen

Abstract

Pseudomonas delafieldii was immobilized in magnetic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) beads using a hydrophilic magnetic fluid, which was prepared by a co-precipitation method. The beads had distinct super-paramagnetic properties and were compared with immobilized cells in non-magnetic PVA beads. Their desulfurizing activity was increased slightly from 8.7 to 9 mmol sulfur kg−1 (dry cell) h−1. The main advantages was that the magnetic immobilized cells maintain a high desulfurization activity and remain in good shape after 7 times of repeated use, while the non-magnetic immobilized cells could only be used for 5 times. Furthermore, the magnetic immobilized cells could be easily collected or separated magnetically from the biodesulfurization reactor.

biodesulfurization dibenzothiophene immobilization polyvinyl alcohol Pseudomonas delafieldii 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guo-bin Shan
    • 1
  • Jian-min Xing
    • 1
  • Ming-fang Luo
    • 1
  • Hui-zhou Liu
    • 1
  • Jia-yong Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Separation Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biochemical EngineeringInstitute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP.R. China

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