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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 137–147 | Cite as

The Prevalence of Bisexual and Homosexual Orientation and Related Health Risks Among Adolescents in Northern Thailand

  • Frits van Griensven
  • Peter H. Kilmarx
  • Supaporn Jeeyapant
  • Chomnad Manopaiboon
  • Supaporn Korattana
  • Richard A. Jenkins
  • Wat Uthaivoravit
  • Khanchit Limpakarnjanarat
  • Timothy D. Mastro
Article

Abstract

Homo- or bisexual (HB) adolescents may have greater and different health risks than the population of heterosexual adolescents. We assessed sexual orientation and health risk behaviors in 1,725 consenting 15- to 21-year-old vocational school students in northern Thailand. Data were collected using audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing. Nine percent of males and 11.2% of females identified themselves as homo- or bisexual. HB males had an earlier mean age at sexual debut (14.7 years) and a higher mean number of lifetime sexual partners (7.9) than did heterosexual males (16.8 years and 5.8 partners, respectively). HB males (25.9%) and females (32.2%) were sexually coerced more often than were heterosexual males (4.6%) and females (19.6%). Drug use was reported significantly more frequently by HB females and significantly less frequently by HB males than by their heterosexual counterparts. HB males showed more signs of social isolation and depression than did heterosexual males. We conclude that HB adolescents in northern Thailand are at greater and different health risks than are their heterosexual counterparts. Differential health education messages for HB and heterosexual youth are warranted.

Thailand youth homosexuality bisexuality sexual orientation health risk 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frits van Griensven
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter H. Kilmarx
    • 1
    • 3
  • Supaporn Jeeyapant
    • 1
  • Chomnad Manopaiboon
    • 1
  • Supaporn Korattana
    • 1
  • Richard A. Jenkins
    • 2
  • Wat Uthaivoravit
    • 4
  • Khanchit Limpakarnjanarat
    • 1
  • Timothy D. Mastro
    • 2
  1. 1.Thailand MOPH-U.SCDC CollaborationNonthaburiThailand
  2. 2.Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, STD and TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlanta
  3. 3.Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV, STD and TB PreventionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlanta
  4. 4.Chiang Rai Public Health OfficeChiang RaiThailand

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