Asia Pacific Journal of Management

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 491–513 | Cite as

Contributing to Global Management Knowledge: A Case for High Quality Indigenous Research

  • Anne S. Tsui
Article

Abstract

The major contributor to global management knowledge is scholarship in developed economies, especially in North America and Western Europe. The development of a global management knowledge base lags behind the globalization of business enterprises. With the emergence of many developing economies around the world, progress in building the body of global management knowledge could be enhanced by encouraging high quality indigenous research in these novel contexts. This essay is a complementary piece to the APJM Special Issue on Asian Management Research: Frontiers and Challenges (August 2002). It discusses three types of global management models through two types of context-sensitive research. It argues the need for high quality indigenous research, using the influential studies on management in the Chinese context as illustrations. It offers guidelines on conducting high quality indigenous research that produces contextualized knowledge on the one hand and contributes to global knowledge on the other.

indigenous research context-sensitive research contextualization global management research 

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne S. Tsui
    • 1
  1. 1.Arizona State University, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Peking UniversityUSA

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