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The Responsiveness of State Mental Health Authorities to Parents with Mental Illness

  • Kathleen Biebel
  • Joanne Nicholson
  • Valerie Williams
  • Beth R. Hinden
Article

Abstract

The majority of adults with serious mental illness living in the community are parents, many of whom may be receiving services from State Mental Health Authorities (SMHA). Innovative intervention approaches are available to improve outcomes for these parents and their children. Analyses of SMHA and state-level data, as well as qualitative interviews of administrators, service providers, and consumers, underscore the importance of organizational structure and philosophy, an advocacy presence, and available funding to SMHA efforts on behalf of parents and their families.

State Mental Health Authority systems change parental mental illness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Biebel
    • 1
  • Joanne Nicholson
    • 2
  • Valerie Williams
    • 3
  • Beth R. Hinden
    • 4
  1. 1.Research Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Services ResearchUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolNorth Worcester
  2. 2.Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Family Medicine, Center for Mental Health Services ResearchUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolNorth Worcester
  3. 3.Research Instructor, Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Services ResearchUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolNorth Worcester
  4. 4.Research Assistant Professor, Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Services ResearchUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolNorth Worcester

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