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Agroforestry Systems

, Volume 60, Issue 1, pp 93–99 | Cite as

Vegetative propagation of Vitellaria paradoxa by grafting

  • Haby Sanou
  • Sie Kambou
  • Zewge Teklehaimanot
  • Mamadou Dembélé
  • Harouna Yossi
  • Sibidu Sina
  • Lompo Djingdia
  • Jean-Marc Bouvet
Article

Abstract

Vitellaria paradoxa or karité is a wild fruit-bearing tree species of sudano-sahelian parklands that plays an important socio-economic role in Sub-Saharan Africa due to the commercial and domestic value of the fruits. Principal constraints of karité fruit production are: long juvenile phase, slow growth, genetic variability and lack of knowledge regarding the cultivation of the species. To address these constraints and to enhance productivity and quality, five methods of grafting (side cleft, top cleft, tongue, chip budding and side veneer), two methods of pre-treatment of scions and rootstocks (washing with 10% sodium hypochlorite to wash off latex and sterilise and a control without washing), and two methods of protection of grafts against desiccation (covering with white plastic sheet and aluminium foil) were tested. The results showed decreasing success of survival of grafts 16 weeks after grafting for the five grafting techniques: side cleft (86.1%), tongue (80.9%), top cleft (78.1%), chip budding (38.1%) and side veneer (20.7%) grafting methods. The results also showed May to be the optimum time for grafting, with high rates of shoot growth and survival of grafts. The average annual growth rate of grafts was 12.6 cm. The pre-treatment of scions with 10% sodium hypochlorite, however, had no significant effect on survival of scions. There was also no significant difference in survival of scions between the two methods of protection of grafts against desiccation (aluminium foil and plastic sheet). Two grafts produced fruits two years after grafting using side veneer grafting.

Budding Domestication Karité Rootstock Scion Sudano-sahelian parklands 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haby Sanou
    • 1
  • Sie Kambou
    • 2
  • Zewge Teklehaimanot
    • 3
  • Mamadou Dembélé
    • 1
  • Harouna Yossi
    • 1
  • Sibidu Sina
    • 2
  • Lompo Djingdia
    • 2
  • Jean-Marc Bouvet
    • 4
  1. 1.Programme Ressources ForestièresInstitut d'Economie Rurale (IER)Sotuba, BamakoMali
  2. 2.Centre National de Semences ForestieresOuagadougouBurkina Faso
  3. 3.School of Agricultural and Forest SciencesUniversity of Wales-BangorGwyneddUK
  4. 4.Cirad-forêt Campus international de Baillarguet TA 10/CMontpellier CedexFrance

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