Advertisement

The Sikh Model of the Person, Suffering, and Healing: Implications for Counselors

  • Jaswinder Singh Sandhu
Article

Abstract

The migration of South Asians to the Western hemisphere calls for a more flexible approach to integrate traditional South Asian healing resources into the practice of counseling. Through an analysis of primary textual and secondary sources, this paper delineates the Sikh model of the person, suffering, and healing. The paper concludes by drawing parallels with Western counseling theory, and a case vignette to illustrate how the Sikh spiritual tradition can be integrated with Western psychotherapy.

Sikh South Asian Eastern spirituality cross-cultural 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Coward, H. C. (2000). Scripture in the World Religions. Oxford: One World.Google Scholar
  2. Doabia, H. S. (1998). Sacred Nitnem [Daily Prayers]. Amritsar, India: Singh Brothers.Google Scholar
  3. Gaines, A. (1992). Ethnopsychiatry: The cultural construction of professional and folk psychiatries. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.Google Scholar
  4. Grewal, J. S. (1990). The Sikhs of the Punjab. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Guru Granth Sahib. (Damdami Version). Amritsar, India: Sri Gurmat Press. (Original work published 1706 C.E.)Google Scholar
  6. Ibrahim, F., Ohnishi, H., & Sandhu, D. S. (1997). Asian American identity development: A culture specific model for South Asian Americans. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 25, 34-50.Google Scholar
  7. Ishiyama, F. I., & Westwood, M. J. (1992). Enhancing client-validating communication: Helping discouraged clients in cross-cultural adjustment. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 20, 50-63.Google Scholar
  8. Ivey, A. (1979). Counseling psychology: The most broadly-based applied psychology speciality. The Counseling Psychologist, 8(3), 3-6.Google Scholar
  9. Johnson, A. W., & Nadirshaw, Z. (1993). Good practice in transcultural counseling: An Asian perspective. British Journal of Guidance and Counseling, 21(1), 20-29.Google Scholar
  10. Kaur, J. (1985). The concept of man in Sikhism. Arlington Heights: Gurmat Publishers.Google Scholar
  11. Kohli, S. S. (1974). Sikh ethics. New Delhi, India: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.Google Scholar
  12. Martz, E. (2002). Principles of Eastern philosophies viewed from the framework of Yalom's four existential concerns. International Journal for the Advancement of Counseling, 24, 31-42.Google Scholar
  13. Maskeen, S. S. (1990). Guru Joti [The Light of the Guru]. Amritsar, India: Singh Brothers.Google Scholar
  14. Maskeen, S. S. (1993). Guru Chintan [Reflecting on the Guru]. Amritsar, India: Singh Brothers.Google Scholar
  15. McCormick, R. (1996). Culturally appropriate means and ends of counseling as described by the First Nations people of British Columbia. International Journal for the Advancement of Counseling, 18, 163-172.Google Scholar
  16. Morjaria, A., & Orford, J. (2002). The role of religion and spirituality in recovery from drink problems: A qualitative study of AA members and South Asian men. Addiction, Research, and Theory, 10(3), 225-256.Google Scholar
  17. Nayar, K. (2004). The Sikh diaspora in Vancouver: The three generations amid tradition, modernity, and multiculturalism. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  18. Nwachuku, U., & Ivey, A. (1991). Culture specific counseling: An alternative training model. Journal of Counseling and Development, 70, 106-111.Google Scholar
  19. Paranjpe, A. C. (1996). Some basic psychological concepts from the intellectual tradition of India. Psychology and Developing Societies, 8(1), 7-27.Google Scholar
  20. Sembhi, S., & Dein, S. (1998). The use of traditional healers by Asian psychiatric patients in the UK: A pilot study. Mental Health, Religion, and Culture, 1(2), 127-133.Google Scholar
  21. Singh, A. (1970). Ethics of the Sikhs. Patiala, India: Punjabi University.Google Scholar
  22. Singh, G. (1993). Sri Guru Granth Sahib [English Version]. New Delhi, India: World Book Center. (Original work published 1706 C.E.)Google Scholar
  23. Singh, J. (2000). Discovering divine love in the play of life. Journal of Contemporary Sikh Studies [Surrey].Google Scholar
  24. Singh, N. (1990). Philosophy of Sikhism. New Delhi, India: Atlantic Publishers.Google Scholar
  25. Singh, R. (1975). Glimpses of the Divine Masters. New Delhi, India: International Traders Corporation.Google Scholar
  26. Singh, S. (1982). Philosophical foundations of the Sikh value system. New Delhi, India: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.Google Scholar
  27. Torrey, E. F. (1972). The mind game: Witch doctors and psychiatrists. New York: Emerson Hall.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Counseling Psychology, Faculty of EducationUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

Personalised recommendations