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Biodiversity & Conservation

, Volume 10, Issue 12, pp 2129–2138 | Cite as

Evaluation of conservation status of Lactoris fernandeziana Philippi (Lactoridaceae) in Chile

  • Marcia Ricci
Article

Abstract

The Juan Fernández Archipelago is located 667 km (about 360 nautical miles) west of central Chile (33° S). It is composed of three islands: Robinson Crusoe, Santa Clara and Alejandro Selkirk. Since its discovery in 1574, the islands have been exposed to strong anthropogenic disturbance as a product of colonization. The vascular flora presents a high degree of endemism. Among the Magnoliophyta, 68% of the species are endemic, 15% of the genera and the monotypic family, Lactoridaceae, has only one species, Lactoris fernandeziana, Phil., which is found exclusively on Robinson Crusoe island. This species is a shrub which has been catalogued as extremely rare. More than 960 individuals of Lactoris fernandeziana, over 30 cm in height, were found in 14 localities. The height structure of the individuals suggests a species in recovery. In germination tests under experimental conditions the species shows a light requirement; seedling establishment was difficult and all individuals died within six months. Results are discussed in the light of the conservation measures undertaken by the administration of the Juan Fernández Archipelago National Park. Further studies on the population dynamics and the genetic structure of L. fernandeziana are needed to assure its conservation.

Chile conservation Juan Fernández Islands Lactoris fernandeziana plant distribution 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcia Ricci
    • 1
  1. 1.Jardín Botánico NacionalViña del MarChile

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