Advertisement

Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture

, Volume 49, Issue 1, pp 39–44 | Cite as

Effectiveness of indoleacetic acid, indolebutyric acid and naphthaleneacetic acid during adventitious root formation in vitro in Malus ‘Jork 9’

  • Geert-Jan De Klerk
  • Jolanda Ter Brugge
  • Svetla Marinova
Article

Abstract

We have examined in vitro rooting of apple ‘Jork 9‘ shoots exposed for three weeks to each of the three auxins commonly used for ex vitro rooting: indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). During the initial five days of the rooting treatment, the cultures were incubated in darkness. In this period, the root initials are formed. Then, the cultures were moved to the light. NAA resulted in a low (ca. 8 roots), and IAA or IBA in a high (ca. 15 roots) maximal root number. The maximal root number was reached at a wide range of IAA concentrations (10-100 μM) but at only one concentration of IBA (10 μM) or NAA (3 μM). With NAA and IBA, growth of roots and shoots was much more inhibited than with IAA. For these reasons, IAA is the preferable auxin for in vitro rooting of apple ‘Jork 9’ shoots.

apple auxin micropropagation rooting woody plants 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Boxus P (1974) —La culture deméristèmes de Prunus pour l'obtention de plants sains. Acta Hortic. 44: 43–46Google Scholar
  2. De Klerk GJ, Ter Brugge J, Smulders R & Benschop M (1990) Basic peroxidases and rooting in microcuttings of Malus. Acta Hortic. 280: 29–36Google Scholar
  3. De Klerk GJ & Caillat E (1994) Rooting responses of stem-disks excised from the same ‘M9 Jork’ microcutting. Adv. Hort. Sci. 8: 15–18Google Scholar
  4. De Klerk GJ, Keppel M, Ter Brugge J & Meekes H (1995) Timing of the phases in adventitious root formation in apple microcuttings. J. Exp. Bot. 46: 965–972Google Scholar
  5. Dunlap JR, Kresovich S & McGee RE (1986) The effect of salt concentration on auxin stability in culture media. Plant Physiol. 81: 934–936PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Epstein E & Ludwig-Müller J (1993) Indole-3-butyric acid in plants: occurrence, synthesis, metabolism and transport. Physiol. Plant. 88: 382–389CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. George EF (1996) Plant Propagation by Tissue Culture. Part 2. In Practice. Exegetics Ltd., EddingtonGoogle Scholar
  8. Hartmann HT, Kester DE & Davies FT (1990) Plant Propagation: Principles and Practices, Prentice Hall, Englwood Cliffs, NJGoogle Scholar
  9. Jasik J & De Klerk GJ (1997) Anatomical and ultrastructural examination of adventitious root formation in stem slices of apple. Biol. Plant. 39, 79–90CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Mohammed GH & Vidaver WE (1990) The influence of acclimatization treatment and plantlet morphology on early greenhouse performance of tissue-cultured Douglas fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco]. Plant Cell Tiss. Org. Cult. 21: 111–117CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Nissen SJ & Sutter EG (1990) Stability of IAA and IBA in nutrient medium of several tissue culture procedures. HortScience 25: 800–802Google Scholar
  12. Peeters AJM, Gerads W, Barendse GWM & Wullems GJ (1991) In vitro flower bud formation in tobacco: interaction of hormones. Plant Physiol. 97: 402–408PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Smulders MJM, Van De Ven ETWM, Croes AF & Wullems GJ (1990) Metabolism of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid in explants of tobacco: evidence for release of free hormone from conjugates. J. Plant Growth Regul. 9: 27–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Van Der Krieken W M, Breteler H, Visser MHM & Mavridou D (1993) The role of conversion of IBA into IAA on root regeneration in apple: introduction of a test system. Plant Cell Rep. 12: 203–206Google Scholar
  15. Van Telgen HJ, Van Mil A & Kunneman B (1992) Effect of propagation and rooting conditions on acclimatization of micropropagated plants. Acta Bot. Neerl. 41: 453–460Google Scholar
  16. Wisniewski LA, Frampton LJ & McKeand SE (1986) Early shoot and root quality effects on nursery and field development of tissuecultured loblolly pine. HortScience 21: 1185–1186Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geert-Jan De Klerk
    • 1
  • Jolanda Ter Brugge
    • 1
  • Svetla Marinova
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Plant Tissue Culture ResearchLisseThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations