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Biologia Plantarum

, Volume 47, Issue 1, pp 145–148 | Cite as

Effect of 6-benzyladenine and Casein Hydrolysate on Micropropagation of Amorpha fruticosa

  • H.H. Gao
  • W. Li
  • J. Yang
  • Y. Wang
  • G.Q. Guo
  • G.C. Zheng
Article

Abstract

Using apical and axillary nodes as explants, a rapid and efficient method for propagation of Amorpha fruticosa L. has been developed. When grown on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 8 mg dm−3 benzyladenine, 100 % explants responded with 4.94 shoots per explant after 6-weeks culture, and explants taken from the in vitro proliferated shoots subsequently produced multiple shoots when cultured on the same medium. The addition of casein hydrolysate (200 mg dm−3) enhanced the number of shoots up to 8.77 per subculture, and coconut milk was found to promote the shoot elongation and make them grow more vigorously, 82.53 % excised shoots were rooted on half-strength MS medium containing 2.0 mg dm−3 indoleacetic acid after 3 weeks of incubation. After acclimatization, all of the rooted plantlets established in soil, exhibiting uniform morphological and growth characteristics.

acclimatization false indigo growth regulators in vitro cultivation plant regeneration 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.H. Gao
    • 1
  • W. Li
    • 1
  • J. Yang
    • 1
  • Y. Wang
    • 1
  • G.Q. Guo
    • 1
  • G.C. Zheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Cell BiologyLanzhou UniversityLanzhou, GansuP.R. China

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